DJ Wez G - the finest House Music, Chillout and Drum & Bass close ×
+

KryKey Web Radio: Lyvshow – Stream what you want

Always at the cutting cusp of web radio technology, KryKey has now released Lyvshow, a plugin to its web radio service that allows radio show hosters to publish their own material. It bypasses the standard KryKey studio and allows broadcasters to use their own software, be it Traktor, Virtual DJ or Itunes. It also incorporates Skype for ease of radio station callins. We’ll certainly be giving the new service a whirl over at http://shuffleradio.org  

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

KryKey Web Radio #IPhone #app – Review

KryKey IPhone App

  Technology is shrinking. We are moving into areas through mobile technology that would have been unenvisaged 20 years ago. Devices bring us together on the move and we share photos, music, film, like never before. The disruptive web radio technology, that is #KryKey, now brings web radio to your pocket, with the release of its eagerly anticipated mobile app. Having just purchased a new #IPhone, I decided to surf over to the Apple App Store and test out what KryKey’s app brings to the table. It’s nice and easy to get hold of this FREE app from the Apple App store… Just a quick search of ‘KryKey’ will list the Premium app for free download and installation time is fast. The app is pretty much streamlined and for the data it handles, works very efficiently. The app builds on the successful web-based platform of http://KryKey.com and brings web radio to your fingertips. The first noticeable thing about the KryKey app is the design. It is structured to look like a traditional radio, with easy to use dials, all app-subscribing radio stations being allocated their own digital frequency, with plenty of space available at present to allow for company growth. Obviously, listeners and app users will remember the frequencies of their favourite KryKey radio stations and be able to simply whirl the dial to quickly tap between shows, in the same manner in which one used to flick through a car radio. There’s an initial sign up to the app which requires a simple email address and some locational information, to tailor the app to your needs. This is non-essential though and the app will function anonymously, if required. You have the pre-mentioned dial, for simplicity, though for the first few uses of app, it might be more advisable to use the search features to get to know the network a bit better. The preset dials can be customised for easy browsing, like any standard, traditional radio. The search features allow radio stations to be navigated by various subdivisions: Music genre, Radio Name, City or wider, by country. The app is only available for broadcast for KryKey Premium stations, that pay the $30 or so monthly fee for the new service. KryKey used to have over 60000 personal radio stations and since the streamlining of the business, ahead of app release, most of the dross has been culled and only the…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Getting digitized?

As I’ve clearly stated in the past: I’m a vinyl junkie. An analogue dinosaur. In the field of dance music we have often been the very first genre to embrace new technology. Indeed, more than any other musical variety, dance music and audio technology are intertwined. I have watched all this change and although it interests me a lot, when it comes to performance I am an absolute Luddite. Turning up at clubs to watch my dancefloor heroes play on CD decks makes me want to send the sparkling lights and fancy buttons hurling to the ground. Like a nineteenth century cotton mill, the pioneer CDJs 1000, lying in bits would bring a smile of satisfaction to my face. I’m told they’re sexy. I just feel that CD DJing is cheating – not so much the technology aspect, as in principal it is the same technique as vinyl DJing, but that the audience is cheated. I watch with horror as my favourite record shops close down as everyone turns to the cheaper alternative… Anyway – I have stuck to my guns regarding CDs and remain a vinylist. However, it’s not just CDs that have changed the face of DJing. One of my favourite DJs is Sasha. I remember reading several years ago how he was embracing Ableton for production. I remember picking up a (vinyl) copy of Involver in 2004 and being blown away by the ‘new’ sound. The thick bass, the really electronic feel, floor-friendly loops, perfectly cut vocals… It is an ambition to produce music and I’ve always liked the sound of Ableton. I dabbled with Cubase a few years ago but Ableton seems to be the software daddy. Shock horror – I realised that Ableton could be used for DJing. I was at a gig at the Q bar, Cardiff, and the DJ had a laptop and a complex looking MIDI controller. He was playing an Ableton Live DJ set… I trainspotted for a bit, to check how it all works… DJs are anoraks at heart and get a high watching others at work. It is the quickest way to improve your style, by studying others in action. I started to interrupt the guy by bombarding him with questions. It all looked posh and he seemed a bit snobbish, with all his fancy equipment… He was very vague and seemed to be avoiding my answers. I didn’t…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Is the DJ an artist?

DJing is a relatively new phenomenon. Sure, DJs have existed on the radio for some time, playing song selections on the radio, or providing the soundtrack to weddings and fortieth birthday parties. However, mixing as an art form emerged in the late seventies, early eighties, when DJs such as Frankie Knuckles in America, started doing live edits to underground disco music, seaming tracks together to enhance the flow of the music and boost their party-hard audiences. This was initially done using tape machines. A pair of scissors and some cellotape and your wannabee jock could splice together songs. It was a rudimentary art form but it worked. Modern DJing was born out of this tape splicing when someone realised that the highend Technics 1200 turntable which had been around since the early seventies, had a pitch control unit which enabled DJs to manipulate songs further, and begin to actually beat match and mix them together. DJing was alive and disco and early house music provided the new soundtrack of a generation. Hip Hop jumped quickly on board and the workability of the Technics turntable meant a whole new form of skilled DJs cutting and scratching tracks. Bodypopping and breakdancing was all to the beat of the Technics turntable. I need not continue with the evolution of dance music. Suffice it to say, it has run hand in hand with innovation and technology. DJing became a career option. The problem is, as is very often the case with emerging sciences, how do you categorise a DJ? Are they musicians, artists, skilled, unskilled? Are they on the same level of employment in a nightclub as a barman or cloakroom attendant? Surely they are not creative as they just use other people’s artistic skills… Are they artists in their own right? Is a DJ on a par with a violinist or a concert pianist? When you are in the company of musicians and mention that you are a DJ, scorn is usually poured upon you. You aren’t fit to lace their boots – they are skilled, you are just an operator…. I beg to differ. DJs may use other people’s music for their art (though self-produced DJ tracks are becoming more common during a mixset). Using other people’s creative material is not a new phenomenon in the field of music. Take for example a concert pianist or violinist. Surely they often play symphonies…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Radio Rebelde

In February 1958, Che Guevara, a leading revolutionary in Cuba, set up Radio Rebelde, to help the cause of the July 26th movement. Led by Fidel Castro, this movement had been encamped in the hills of east Cuba, the Sierra Maestra, fighting a guerrilla war against the Cuban army forces of General Fulgencio Batista, the Cuban Dictator. This war had been waged since December 1956. A small band of exiled Cubans had returned to the island under the leadership of Fidel Castro. They sailed from Mexico aboard the Granma. A young Argentinian doctor called Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara, formed an integral part of this movement. ‘Che’ would eventually lead his own column in the march out of the Sierra Maestra to the Llano in the final offensive on government forces to seize control of the Cuban cities. In the new Cuban Revolutionary Government, Che would have leading roles. His literate mind and eloquence would make him the most famous revolutionary in the world. In his later job for the Cuban government he would address the United Nations as well as form a key member of the Communist ruling elite. He was to hold the position of Minister of Agriculture and he would also be the key Cuban contact in their relations with the Soviet Union, participating in particular heavily during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. This ‘face of the revolution’ was an idealistic thinker. He was an intellectual. A thinking man’s fighter. Che had been inspired to join the July 26th movement as a result of his motorcycle travels through Latin America where he witnessed the social struggle of the poor and felt directly the effects of US imperialism. In Guatemala, Che witnessed the CIA overthrow of the régime of Jacobo Arbenz. Che had realised the importance of the CIA’s clandestine radio operation in Guatemala. They had set up a station, La Voz de la Liberación, which broadcast propaganda. In Cuba, Batista had been utilising propaganda, manipulating the course of the war, falsely reporting casualties of the Rebels, and lying to the people in general. Censorship had been introduced and correct information was difficult to determine. Several journalists had visited the Rebel bases in the Sierra Maestra but this would not suffice for the anticipated revolution. At Che’s command post, Pata de la Mesa, some radio equipment arrived and the first broadcasts of Radio Rebelde were transmitted. Radio Rebelde was…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Wintertime Blues

Wintertime winds blow cold the seasonFallen in love, I’m hopin’ to beWind is so cold, is that the reason?Keeping you warm, your hands touching me Come with me dance, my dearWinter’s so cold this yearYou are so warmMy wintertime love to be Winter time winds blue and freezin’Comin’ from northern storms in the seaLove has been lost, is that the reason?Trying desperately to be free Come with me dance, my dearWinter’s so cold this yearAnd you are so warmMy wintertime love to be La, la, la, la Come with me dance, my dearWinter’s so cold this yearYou are so warmMy wintertime love to be[The Doors: Wintertime Love (from Waiting for the Sun album)] Well – the long cold winter is finally over (unless you happen to be reading this in the southern hemisphere!). Vestal virgins are dancing around the sacred fire in preparations for an exciting summer of music festivals. In the UK at this time of year bands are extremely busy hounding festival promoters in order to fill up their summer calendars. The winter hibernation is over and the whole music industry comes to life. The Miami Winter Music conference has just finished and DJs and dance acts are groggily filling planes across the world, returning with their tales of mayhem, and the tracks which will be lacing the summer dancefloors from the Punta Del Este to the streets of San Antonio. The creative spirit comes alive in spring, as flowers blossom and trees flood the countryside with green luminescence from their returning leaves. Like squirrels just run out of nuts, here at KryKey we are plaguing the landscape in search of new food to feast on as we bask in the sun’s rays. At festivals across the globe there is a mad rush by emerging bands and artists to fill the bill in new stages. They need to showcase their music and gain new fans. We have decided to support these emerging artists and have opened the floor of four prime KryKey radio stations for this purpose. London Web Radio, Desert One, Oz Radio and DJ, are all seeking out music from artists to fill the airwaves. We believe that exposing new talent to the masses is a critical aspect of the music industry. Our growing radio network now has a significant impact on the music industry (there are now over 230 global KryKey radio stations) and we…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

1 2