DJ Wez G - the finest House Music, Chillout and Drum & Bass close ×
+

Review: Translation and Identity in the Americas

Translation And Identity In The Americas

Translation and Identity in the Americas by Gentzler Edwin My rating: 5 of 5 stars This was the first book I have borrowed and read from Cardiff University library’s Translation section. As a Translation student focussing on the Spanish language, I felt that this book would offer plenty of interest to me, considering that the Americas has the largest hispanic population in the world. The book is subdivided into five main chapters, each directed towards a certain geographic region in the Americas. The monolingualism of the USA, with its vast multicultural population, displays problems in the cultural struggles created by the way it forces minorities to adapt to English, the arrogance of this coming to light very much in the post September 11th world where military action has often been plagued with troubles of mistranslation and at official levels, an overwhelming dependence upon the force majeure of the official tongue. Quebec offers a unique zone in the Americas and its struggles with linguistic identity and its isolation are clearly demonstrated by Edwin. I found the history of Quebec to be enlightening and was new knowledge to me. The way that its patois language, joual, struggles to define itself in a society dominated by colonial English and French, formed a major role in the Quebecois independence movement and has manifested itself in local theatre and the adaptation of translation as a device for the feminist movement. This feminist translation in Quebec has transcended to borders and come to the forefront of translation studies worldwide. The chapter on Brazilian Cannibalism was, for me, the most interesting of the whole book. It truly indicates a unique way of looking at the post-colonial world. How cannibalism itself can be viewed from within Brazil as a positive force yet to the external viewer it is seen as a negative connotation of savagery, demonstrates the Derridaean deconstruction at play in translation to a relatively understandable level for the novice initiate into translation studies. The cannibalist school of thought shows how translation redefines boundaries and how there is a struggle between cultures in the process. The works of Latin American fiction authors and their relationships to Translation was particularly relevant to me, as a student of Spanish. I discovered some new authors here and have bookmarked their work. I also, as a result of this chapter, plan to reread Garcia Marquez’ 100 Years of Solitude, to view…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Translation and Identity in the Americas

Translation and Identity in the Americas by Gentzler Edwin My rating: 5 of 5 stars This was the first book I have borrowed and read from Cardiff University library’s Translation section. As a Translation student focussing on the Spanish language, I felt that this book would offer plenty of interest to me, considering that the Americas has the largest hispanic population in the world. The book is subdivided into five main chapters, each directed towards a certain geographic region in the Americas. The monolingualism of the USA, with its vast multicultural population, displays problems in the cultural struggles created by the way it forces minorities to adapt to English, the arrogance of this coming to light very much in the post September 11th world where military action has often been plagued with troubles of mistranslation and at official levels, an overwhelming dependence upon the force majeure of the official tongue. Quebec offers a unique zone in the Americas and its struggles with linguistic identity and its isolation are clearly demonstrated by Edwin. I found the history of Quebec to be enlightening and was new knowledge to me. The way that its patois language, joual, struggles to define itself in a society dominated by colonial English and French, formed a major role in the Quebecois independence movement and has manifested itself in local theatre and the adaptation of translation as a device for the feminist movement. This feminist translation in Quebec has transcended to borders and come to the forefront of translation studies worldwide. The chapter on Brazilian Cannibalism was, for me, the most interesting of the whole book. It truly indicates a unique way of looking at the post-colonial world. How cannibalism itself can be viewed from within Brazil as a positive force yet to the external viewer it is seen as a negative connotation of savagery, demonstrates the Derridaean deconstruction at play in translation to a relatively understandable level for the novice initiate into translation studies. The cannibalist school of thought shows how translation redefines boundaries and how there is a struggle between cultures in the process. The works of Latin American fiction authors and their relationships to Translation was particularly relevant to me, as a student of Spanish. I discovered some new authors here and have bookmarked their work. I also, as a result of this chapter, plan to reread Garcia Marquez’ 100 Years of Solitude, to view…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Wez G Sessions – Episode 12

Wez G Sessions Episode 12

Episode 12 of the Wez G Sessions has a nice range of music with some reggae, pop, eighties, dance music and chillout. :::TRACKLISTING::: 1. Eddy Grant – Living On The Frontline [Ensign] 2. Hallucinogen – Shamanix [Dragonfly Records] 3. Bob Marley – Lively Up Yourself [Island Records] 4. Afterhours – Voglio Una Pelle Splendida [Mescal] 5. Ryskee feat. Jenny Wilson – Horrors Of Love (Jamaica’s Sunshine Remix) [Southern Fried Records] 6. Mojo Rising – Midnight Groove [Cold Busted] 7. Arrested Development – Mr Wendal [Chrysalis] 8. Gus Gus – Barry [4AD] 9. Duran Duran – Girls On Film [EMI] 10. Inner City – Big Fun (Zoo Brazil Remix) [KMS Records] 11. Tori Amos – China [EastWest] Wez G Sessions Episode 12 by Wez G on Mixcloud

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Lost In Translation: Misadventures In English Abroad

Lost In Translation

Lost In Translation: Misadventures In English Abroad by Charlie Croker My rating: 4 of 5 stars I thought I’d try this book out to see some of the problems translators face. The book is a humorous collection of real-life examples of when translators (translating into English) have made embarrassing mistakes… Translation agency’s advertisement in the Moscow Times: Bet us your letter of business translation do. Every people in our staffing know English like the hand of their back. Up to the minuet wise-street phrases, don’t you know, old boy. On a Japanese food package: This cute mild curry uses 100% Japanese apple and cheerful hamster. Finland: If you cannot reach a fire exit, close the door and expose yourself at the window. It’s hard to turn the page in this book without giggling your head off yet at the same time, for the trainee translator, reading the mistakes and attempting to understand how exactly they happened, can be quite a good challenge. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Becoming a Translator: An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Translation

Becoming A Translator

Becoming a Translator: An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Translation by Douglas Robinson My rating: 4 of 5 stars This is another book I’ve read in preparation for the Translation (BA) at Cardiff University on which I’m about to embark. This book aims not so much at the theories of Translation Studies as in other textbooks I have read but focuses more on life as a professional translator. It is preparation for the world of work and discusses many of the issues which one might encounter if one is successful in this career choice. The book has its own ideas and it does perhaps over-apply its terminologies of pattern-building and intuitive leaps. I found it a bit wishy-washy in places as I am still very new to the ideas of Translation. It is easy enough to understand as a basic concept yet the actual science of translation can be quite complicated. There are some nice, practical exercises at the end of each chapter which are good food for thought. I think that this book was a good introduction to translation and I can see it being a useful source of reference for me in years to come. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Introducing Translation Studies: Theories and Applications

Introducing Translation Studies

Introducing Translation Studies: Theories and Applications by Jeremy Munday My rating: 4 of 5 stars Ahead of embarking upon a Translation (BA) at Cardiff University, I thought I’d prepare by investigating one of the course textbooks. This introduction to Translation Studies was a revelation in how it introduced me to the new terminology I will be working with. I initially found the introduction of new models and ways of thinking a little daunting, but by the end of chapter twelve I felt that I was making progress in understanding the general gists of translation studies. The chapter on machine translation was the most appealing to me and I see this as an area in which I might specialise. The case studies at the end of each chapter were particularly thought-provoking and useful in allowing you to grasp the concepts at discussion in each chapter. I felt that this book was an ideal way to anticipate my future degree and I look forward to referring back to this text as my studies progress. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Babel No More: The Search for the World's Most Extraordinary Language Learners

Babel No More

Babel No More: The Search for the World’s Most Extraordinary Language Learners by Michael Erard My rating: 4 of 5 stars I am a keen learner of foreign languages and consider myself a polyglot with experience in about ten different tongues. This book focuses on the search for those rare people in our global society who take the study of languages to the extreme, accumulating masses and becoming masters of Babel. The story begins with the legend of Giuseppe Mezzofanti, a Bolognese cardinal who reached a zenith of 63 languages and used to regularly stun visitors to the Vatican with his linguistic prowess. The author of this book, Michael Erard, tells his journey of discovery and is constantly asking what it takes to be a multipolyglot. I found the book particularly inspiring and I think the advice therein is valuable to any budding linguist. I found the chapters and exploration of tehe brain a little dull but the meeting of various anonymous polyglots across the globe proved inspiring. Analysing little techniques and methods which can help us all improve our minds make this very much a self-help book and to give credit to these talented and unknown individuals is a handsome task. A definite book to read for anyone who is serious about languages. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Babel No More: The Search for the World’s Most Extraordinary Language Learners

Babel No More

Babel No More: The Search for the World’s Most Extraordinary Language Learners by Michael Erard My rating: 4 of 5 stars I am a keen learner of foreign languages and consider myself a polyglot with experience in about ten different tongues. This book focuses on the search for those rare people in our global society who take the study of languages to the extreme, accumulating masses and becoming masters of Babel. The story begins with the legend of Giuseppe Mezzofanti, a Bolognese cardinal who reached a zenith of 63 languages and used to regularly stun visitors to the Vatican with his linguistic prowess. The author of this book, Michael Erard, tells his journey of discovery and is constantly asking what it takes to be a multipolyglot. I found the book particularly inspiring and I think the advice therein is valuable to any budding linguist. I found the chapters and exploration of tehe brain a little dull but the meeting of various anonymous polyglots across the globe proved inspiring. Analysing little techniques and methods which can help us all improve our minds make this very much a self-help book and to give credit to these talented and unknown individuals is a handsome task. A definite book to read for anyone who is serious about languages. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: The Language Wars: A History of Proper English

The Language Wars

The Language Wars: A History of Proper English by Henry Hitchings My rating: 4 of 5 stars About to embark, in September, on a Translation degree, I thought it a good idea to brush up on my rather lamentable English skills and thoroughly cast myself into the depths of this book. It is a worthy and interesting read in which the history of our language is explored. What gave rise to the way we speak in today’s world and what, indeed, will tomorrow’s English be? The author introduces a multitude of well-spun anecdotes from the most famous of our English language writers in addition to tales of those people who were, behind-the-scenes, most influential on the evolution of our tongue. I found the contrasts between UK English and international English most enthralling and equally the chapters on dialogue and accent were riveting. It is interesting to note how the future of our language will be shaped not by English English-speakers but by the vast hordes of foreign speakers of English. The language’s rise to international prominence means that many of the traditions and histories entailed in the book will be overlooked as we step towards future’s embrace. This book may be a bit mundane and high-brow to the average reader. I found it suitably challenging, intellectual and enlightening. A goodread good read. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: The Last Speakers: The Quest to Save the World's Most Endangered Languages

The Last Speakers

The Last Speakers: The Quest to Save the World’s Most Endangered Languages by K. David Harrison My rating: 5 of 5 stars I found this an absolutely fascinating, inspiring tale that truly opened my eyes to one of the planet’s scariest phenomena… We hear of endangered wildlife and how our modern industrial society is harming the environment. We hear of other worrying global issues. But, often neglected and hardly publicised, is the very real situation of the reduction in global language diversity. (Minor) languages, often spoken by marginalised tribespeople in remote areas of the Earth, are disappearing into the annals of history (or remaining unrecorded) as they fade into extinction. We are losing human knowledge at a great rate. This knowledge has accumulated over a great period of time and has characteristics which simply cannot be translated or encoded into larger, more powerful global languages. We think that in our modern world, we have an abundance of knowledge and have improved communication. The invention of the internet and spread of the English language as the dominant lingua franca for global business gives us a false sense of arrogance and superiority. The erosion of ancient knowledge makes us poorer as a global human society, however… Harrison elegantly argues the case for the desperate need to preserve and revitalise these strange tongues ion far-flung places. I think that one of his most valid points in the argument for preservation of language diversity, is that these languages contain critical knowledge of local environments, usually in places which are at most risk of tipping the scale in the imbalance of climate change and environmental degradation which has been demonstrated to affect us all, wherever we may live, and whatever our chosen first language might be. The book is intellectual, but accessible. It provokes serious thinking and demonstrates the careful study and hard graft put in by researchers and indeed last speakers of the most critically endangered tongues. I have close links to Wales and New Zealand which are both leading the way in the mass revitalisation of endangered languages, ie. Maori and Welsh… The mass education program in schools in both of these countries clearly demonstrates the cultural value inherent in revitalisation efforts and serves as a model to other language hotspots where the loss of culture, knowledge and language is at its most perilous. As a student of language, who aims to continue…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: The Last Speakers: The Quest to Save the World’s Most Endangered Languages

The Last Speakers

The Last Speakers: The Quest to Save the World’s Most Endangered Languages by K. David Harrison My rating: 5 of 5 stars I found this an absolutely fascinating, inspiring tale that truly opened my eyes to one of the planet’s scariest phenomena… We hear of endangered wildlife and how our modern industrial society is harming the environment. We hear of other worrying global issues. But, often neglected and hardly publicised, is the very real situation of the reduction in global language diversity. (Minor) languages, often spoken by marginalised tribespeople in remote areas of the Earth, are disappearing into the annals of history (or remaining unrecorded) as they fade into extinction. We are losing human knowledge at a great rate. This knowledge has accumulated over a great period of time and has characteristics which simply cannot be translated or encoded into larger, more powerful global languages. We think that in our modern world, we have an abundance of knowledge and have improved communication. The invention of the internet and spread of the English language as the dominant lingua franca for global business gives us a false sense of arrogance and superiority. The erosion of ancient knowledge makes us poorer as a global human society, however… Harrison elegantly argues the case for the desperate need to preserve and revitalise these strange tongues ion far-flung places. I think that one of his most valid points in the argument for preservation of language diversity, is that these languages contain critical knowledge of local environments, usually in places which are at most risk of tipping the scale in the imbalance of climate change and environmental degradation which has been demonstrated to affect us all, wherever we may live, and whatever our chosen first language might be. The book is intellectual, but accessible. It provokes serious thinking and demonstrates the careful study and hard graft put in by researchers and indeed last speakers of the most critically endangered tongues. I have close links to Wales and New Zealand which are both leading the way in the mass revitalisation of endangered languages, ie. Maori and Welsh… The mass education program in schools in both of these countries clearly demonstrates the cultural value inherent in revitalisation efforts and serves as a model to other language hotspots where the loss of culture, knowledge and language is at its most perilous. As a student of language, who aims to continue…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Is That a Fish in Your Ear? The Amazing Adventure of Translation

Is That A Fish In Your Ear?

Is That a Fish in Your Ear? The Amazing Adventure of Translation by David Bellos My rating: 5 of 5 stars I am starting a degree in Translation at Cardiff University next year and I thought I would try to get to grip with this new endeavour by learning a bit more about the art and science of Translation Studies. David Bellos is a professional with an obvious passion for languages. His book is most interesting and covers a very wide range of areas, neatly categorised into concise chapters which flow together seamlessly. The history of Translation opened my eyes and really build on the often misconceived notions a non-specialist may have on Translation. The book was full of very interesting and educated anecdotes which were often humorous and always memorable. I found the development of machine translation most intriguing and the different roles of translators in the modern world was well-covered. It is very surprising how the English language is represented globally and its dominance as a global lingua franca produces some bizarre skews for the world of translation. there is a dearth of foreign language speakers with English mother-tongue which is one reason why I am studying the Translation degree. This introductory book has really inspired me and convinced me that I am on the right course. I feel motivated by the wide range of possibilities further study in this area could bring. I think that it is a most wise study and I can see that this book will become well-thumbed as a reference-point for me in the future. I don’t reread many books but I can certainly see me repeating this work. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: The Basque History of the World: The Story of a Nation

The Basque History Of The World

The Basque History of the World: The Story of a Nation by Mark Kurlansky My rating: 4 of 5 stars I live in Wales and there are similar issues here as in the Basque country – We have a certain regional autonomy after devolution, there is a strong national feeling and independence movement, it is an industrial heartland and there is a strong tradition and language, populated by a fiercely proud people. I felt that it would be interesting to study the Basques as their struggle tucked in a small borderland between France and Spain is most certainly an interesting one. This book is well written and has a lot of variety, covering history, culture, traditions, political events and even cookery. The more ancient history of Euskadi I found particularly thrilling and most of the information was new to me. As a language student I found the details on the Euskadi language and its history and development fascinating. The struggles against in particular the Spanish state are well-documented and the independence movement culminating in the rise of the infamous ETA can be understood from a Basque perspective, though without being overly biased. Franco’s commitment against regionalism is contrasted with the autonomous areas which came about through democracy and accession to the European Union. The differences and similarities between the French and Spanish sides of the region are well covered, with their great historical characters such as Ignacio Loyola well mentioned. The importance of their land as an industrial and commercial centre from its days as a great fishing community to its rise through the industrial revolution. The occasional Basque recipes thrown in for detail are pleasant interjections and show that the author is a accustomed to writing about this topic in his other works. It’s a shame the book hasn’t been updated to cover the last decade where there have been developments in the Basque land, with more autonomy granted and ETA having declared a permanent ceasefire. The book is a great overall study and introduces plenty of further cultural refeneces which I may take an interest in researching. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: The New Spaniards

The New Spaniards

The New Spaniards by John Hooper My rating: 4 of 5 stars This is a well-written detailed study of Spain and the Spanish and in particular covers the period of change from Franco’s dictatorship into the modern Spanish democracy. The idiosyncrasies of Spain are examined in contrast with the rest of the EU and world. What makes Spain and its people tick? The history and culture are examined and I in particular enjoyed the accounts of the Basque region’s history. There is a lot of political detail, perhaps a bit too much, but it is all explained and leads well on for the author to make good valid points in summarising Spain’s current state. It’s rapid growth and development are apparent and its recent history combines with the desarrollo period to make Spain unique among its contemporaries. The attitudes of the Spanish to themselves and indeed foreigners can be quite eyeopening. I found the cultural chapters to be exceptional and in particular enjoyed the penultimate section which covered Flamenco and bull-fighting. The book is well-written and a student of castellano I found it to be very informative, relevant and enlightening. Anyone who has even the vaguest of interest in Spain should add this to their reading shelves. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers by Xiaolu Guo

A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers

I studied Chinese language for a couple of years and am constantly on the lookout for books about China and its culture. When this jumped out at me from a charity shop bookshelf, at first I thought it was just another dictionary. But I read the back and thought that it would make a good present for my partner and as I had recently bought her the cult erotic tale, ‘Fifty Shades Of Grey’, I thought she could trump all her friends by encountering the Chinese version. I decided that although I’m not a great lover of fiction and no virtually nothing at all about erotic fiction, because of the cultural aspect, I would give it a go myself. I immediately got drawn into the main character. I loved the way the book was presented. For a student of the Mandarin tongue I fully embraced the way the English was written, in a ‘Chinglish’ fashion, and many references were made to the linguistic differences between East and West. Sex in the Orient is often seen in the West as a taboo subject and it is certain that it is viewed in very different terms throughout the globe depending upon one’s culture. I was shocked in a way to hear this young Chinese girl talk so open about her sexual desires and experiences. It was a real eye-opener. Her journeys across Europe and her liasons were very much down to earth and frank, and to be honest very believable. She didn’t experience the Hollywood romances, other fictional writers may depict. Her boudoir was really rather more grounded in the reality of sex, with disappointment, less than perfect partners and a real animalistic edge to the carnal desire, which did seem rather shocking coming from a woman’s mouth, even if she was from the Orient. The book wasn’t all about sex and I found the travel side of the tale very interesting. The clash of cultures, of civilisations, the differences between East and West were fully explored. Not since I read Montesquieu’s Persian Letters, have I read such a good description of how an alien immerses themselves in a totally foreign culture. For anyone who has travelled abroad, especially travelling solo, it is very easy to relate to the findings made in this book. It’s not the grandiose elements of travel that form the memories of the experience, it’s the little details,…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Dragon Translate: An Introduction

Dragon Translate Logo

  I am Wesley Gerrard. I am a 36 year old male who has worked in music for most of his life. I have always had a passion for languages. From the age of about 13 I used to spend every summer alone with a French family in the southwest of Aquitaine where I learnt to speak that beautiful language well. I also studied Spanish in school. I received the maximum grades of A in French GCSE, a in French O Level and A* in GCSE Spanish. After leaving school I maintained an interest in languages, speaking Spanish and French wherever possible. At the age of about 25 I decided to go back to college and in a year at Coleg Gwent, Newport, I passed an A Level French with an A grade and AS level Spanish with an A grade also. Seven years ago I was drawn to studying at the Cardiff Centre For Lifelong Learning. At LEARN there were plenty of language night classes to choose from and I decided to diversify my experience of foreign languages and have taken courses there in French, Spanish, Italian, German, Arabic, Russian and Mandarin Chinese. The staff at LEARN persuaded me to take the Pathways to a degree scheme and as of September 2014 I am embarking on a full-time Translation (BA) at Cardiff University through Pathways. My aim is to retrain as a professional translator and move from a career in music into a new interesting work environment. Hopefully I will get a good degree qualification and further necessary professional qualifications. I aim to specialise in translation from Spanish and French into English but I am also open to working with other foreign languages. I am keen on the tech environment and the possibilities of machine translation and CAT (Computer-Aided Translation) excite me a lot. Dragon Translate is my new business, built in anticipation of the future work I intend to do. First up is getting the degree and then I guess, Dragon Translate will seek to work as a Translation service. Ideally we can partner up with a larger agency to gain work. We hope to build up a good reputation in this new market and deliver high quality work. I’d like to work in the field of entertainment, an area I know well, though am open to all areas and have a wide general knowledge that could be…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Wez G Sessions – Episode 11

Wez G Sessions Episode 11

This week’s Wez G Sessions Episode 11 contains a heady blend of deeper sounds, a nice variety of different flavours and some fancy beats. :::TRACKLISTING::: 1. Vangelis – Love Theme [WEA] 2. Apparat – Granular Bastard [Shitkatapult] 3. Coldcut feat Robert Owens – Walk A Mile (Henrik Schwarz Remix) [Studio !K7] 4. Way Out West – Domination [Deconstruction] 5. De Los Andes – Porque Te Quiero [Unknown] 6.The Doors – LA Woman (Paul Oakenfold Remix) [White] 7. Ennio Morricone – Death Rides A Horse [EMI] 8. Fluke – Life Support [Circa] 9. Fine Young Cannibals – Johnny Come Home [London Records] 10. Banco De Gaia – Last Train To Lhasa [Planet Dog] Wez G Sessions Episode 11 by Wez G on Mixcloud

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Wez G Sessions – Episode 10

Wez G Sessions Episode 10

This week’s episode 10 of the Wez G Sessions showcases some previously unheard exclusive tracks in addition to a variety of music across the board. :::TRACKLISTING::: 1. Röyksopp – This Must Be It (Rex The Dog’s K-Dart Remix) [Wall Of Sound] 2. Franz Ferdinand – Take Me Out [Domino] 3. Lostep vs Sade – Never Thought I’d See The Day [White] 4.Youssou N’dour – Pitche Mi [Virgin Records America] 5. Megman vs Wez G – Monkey Loving [Shuffle Records] 6. Lynyrd Skynyrd – Sweet Home Alabama [MCA Records] 7. Jimmy Cliff – Sunshine In The Music [CBS] 8. Fleetwood Mac – Second Hand News [Warner Bros. Records] 9. Subliminal Cuts – Le Voie Le Soleil (Original Mix) [XL Recordings] 10. The The – Heartland [Epic]   Wez G Sessions Episode 10 by Wez G on Mixcloud

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Open Secret: The Autobiography of the Former Director-General of MI5

Open Secret: The Autobiography of the Former Director-General of MI5 by Stella Rimington My rating: 4 of 5 stars I can remember the media furore when this book was first published though it’s taken me some time to get around to reading it. Stella Rimington was certainly a woman who achieved a lot for the fairer sex, in becoming the first female head of such an important government department. Her views are quite pro-feminist throughout yet she is not overly patronising. I was expecting the book to be full of details on covert missions yet James Bond it ain’t. I think Stella depicts life in the security services in a very humble, human way. She is just a down to earth single mother, trying to raise children as a single mother, who through circumstance, happens to work for the much romanticised MI5. I think her ideas on public perception of the security services must be one-of-a-kind. Not only was she the first female head, but she was the first publicly declared head, in an age of aggressive media, in a period of massive political change (end of Cold War, rise of terrorism). Her views seem well-balanced and although some of the anecdotes are really way out of this world (the visit to Russia, for example), much of what she has to say could apply to any ambitious career woman’s life. It’s a good tale, and although I was initially disappointed with the lack of revelation, I came to grow to enjoy Stella Rimington’s insight into life and through that her telling of her life story. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Wez G Sessions – Episode 9

Wez G Sessions Episode 9

Another refreshing hour’s blend of music in the Wez G Sessions radio show, episode 9 :::TRACKLISTING::: 1. Jinny – Keep Warm (Original Extended Mix) [Multiply Records] 2. Portishead – Sour Times [Go! Discs] 3. Bjork – Big Time Sensuality [One Little Indian] 4. Nush – Nush [UMM] 5. Lou Reed – Walk On The Wild Side [RCA] 6. Belinda Carlisle – Circle In The Sand [Virgin] 7. Al-Pha-X – Punjabi Love Affair [Bar De Lune] 8. Castle Trancelott – Indoctrinate (Original Mix) [Slate] 9. Manu Chao – Je Ne T’aime Plus [Virgin] 10. Goldfrapp – Forever [Mute] 11. Run D.M.C. – Sucker M.C.’s (Krush Groove 1) [Profile Records] 12. Joy Division – No Love Lost [Universal] 13. Thievery Corporation – Culture Of Fear [Eighteenth Street Lounge Music]     Wez G Sessions Episode 9 by Wez G on Mixcloud

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Lost In Translation: Misadventures In English Abroad

Lost In Translation: Misadventures In English Abroad by Charlie Croker My rating: 4 of 5 stars I thought I’d try this book out to see some of the problems translators face. The book is a humorous collection of real-life examples of when translators (translating into English) have made embarrassing mistakes… Translation agency’s advertisement in the Moscow Times: Bet us your letter of business translation do. Every people in our staffing know English like the hand of their back. Up to the minuet wise-street phrases, don’t you know, old boy. On a Japanese food package: This cute mild curry uses 100% Japanese apple and cheerful hamster. Finland: If you cannot reach a fire exit, close the door and expose yourself at the window. It’s hard to turn the page in this book without giggling your head off yet at the same time, for the trainee translator, reading the mistakes and attempting to understand how exactly they happened, can be quite a good challenge. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Wez G Sessions – Episode 8

Wez G Sessions - Episode 8

This week’s show has an eclectic mix of old and new, going back to the 60s, then on through the daisy age to some more contemporary dance music. :::TRACKLISTING::: 1. Massive Attack – Atlas Air [Virgin] 2. Velvet Underground – Sweet Jane [Mercury] 3. De La Soul – Me, Myself And I [Tommy Boy] 4. U2 – Angel Of Harlem [Island Records] 5. Gabriel & Dresden feat. Molly – Tracking Treasure Down (Robbie Rivera Vocal Mix) [Organised Nature] 6. Matt Springfield – Things I’ve Said [Akamusic] 7. The Doors – Love Street [Elektra] 8. 4 Hero – Cookin Up Yah Brain [Reinforced Records] 9. Consuelo Luz – Los Bilbilicos (The Nightingales) [Chall’OMusic] 10. Aphex Twin – Analogue Bubblebath (Dumb Dan Edit) [White] 11. Simon & Garfunkel – Bridge Over Troubled Water [Columbia]     Wez G Sessions Episode 8 by Wez G on Mixcloud

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest