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Review: French Industrial Relations in the New World Economy – by Nick Parsons

This book focuses on the different components that comprise French Industrial relations, neatly divided up into 8 distinct chapters with a thorough introduction and conclusion. Each chapter goes into detailing a particular aspect of the French Labour movement. It looks at the role of the State, Employers and also Trade Unions and the interactions that, often complicated, form the tenuous bond between each of these bodies. The climax of the book is in the final ‘Conflicts’ chapter which details strikes in France, a country where the population is globally recognised for its propensity to get onto the streets. France has a very strong Jacobin State, weak Trade Union membership and very high Collective Bargaining coverage. The uniqueness of French Industrial relations make this an interesting study and for my ‘History of French Labour’ course that I study at Cardiff University (taught by author of this volume, Dr Nick Parsons), the book is an essential read and a key source of reference. It builds on less comprehensive studies of French Industrial relations that I have picked up from other books.

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Review: French Industrial Relations in the New World Economy – by Nick Parsons

french industrial relations

This book focuses on the different components that comprise French Industrial relations, neatly divided up into 8 distinct chapters with a thorough introduction and conclusion. Each chapter goes into detailing a particular aspect of the French Labour movement. It looks at the role of the State, Employers and also Trade Unions and the interactions that, often complicated, form the tenuous bond between each of these bodies. The climax of the book is in the final ‘Conflicts’ chapter which details strikes in France, a country where the population is globally recognised for its propensity to get onto the streets. France has a very strong Jacobin State, weak Trade Union membership and very high Collective Bargaining coverage. The uniqueness of French Industrial relations make this an interesting study and for my ‘History of French Labour’ course that I study at Cardiff University (taught by author of this volume, Dr Nick Parsons), the book is an essential read and a key source of reference. It builds on less comprehensive studies of French Industrial relations that I have picked up from other books.

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Seminar Presentation: A History of French Labour – 29.11.17

Today I gave a seminar presentation on the History of French Labour and below is the 15 slide presentation I prepared on Powerpoint for the seminar.   History of French Labour – Seminar 29.11.17   The history, present and future of the French labour movement: continued division, contestation and weakness?   History 1789 Revolution creates a strong Jacobin State, characteristic of the French government until the present day. (An archetypical dirigiste state) Original Revolution plus three subsequent 19th century revolutions (July Monarchy, Second Empire, Third Republic) all tend to use the working class / masses to ignite the fire of revolution but ultimately all favour bourgeois ideals. Industrialization France is relatively late in comparison with its European neighbours to undergo the industrial revolution. When it does industrialize, it maintains a large peasant element in rural areas and the emerging working class are concentrated in certain northern regions and in the big cities The Nature of the French People Due to the Jacobin structure of government, intermediary bodies between the state and the people are not encouraged. Also, the French people have a genuine disinterest in ‘signing-up’ to large groups / organizations although they do have Nationalistic tendencies when it comes to State interests. This leads to the small membership numbers of Trade Unions. Trade Unions 1791 Le Chapelier Law – Outlaws Trade Unions Trade Unions eventually legalized in 1884 Right to strike recognized in 1864, before Unions were legal. Working class solidarity not encouraged at all and there has always been conflict in any attempts for the Labour movement to organize itself. Trade Unions Union membership always been traditionally low, rising to a peak of about a third of employees following 1968 Strikes. Today’s membership figures are only around 7% of workforce. Union membership, however not essential to the way they work in France and their core members are good at propelling the workforce into strike action. Lowest Union density in Western World Collective Bargaining coverage, however, is very high at 95%, much higher than international economic competitors. Trade Unions CGT Confédération Générale du Travail CFTC Confédération Française des Travailleurs Chrétiens CFDT Confédération Française Démocratique du Travail CFE-CGC Confédération Française de l’Encadrement – Confédération Générale des Cadres FO – Force Ouvrière Others – SUD – Solitaires Unitaires Démocratiques –CNT – Confédération Nationale du Travail –FSU – Fédération Syndicale Unitaire   Employers There is a Paternalistic approach to employees Many of…

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Review: A Social History of France in the 19th Century – by Christophe Charle

This is a translation from the original French and as such I feel that sometimes reads a little strangely as an academic study in that it sometimes has an unusual technique for presenting ideas. It is quite rich in statistics and sometimes the data can be overwhelming. The book is neatly broken down into chapters which focus on the different effects during multiple time periods on the individual classes which compromised 19th century French society. It is clear that each of the revolutions that occurred during this period, even though often initially driven by the lower classes, all had a tendency to ultimately favour the bourgeois status quo among society’s political elite. Even though peasants and working class often bore the brunt of society’s effects, it is also apparent from the study that by the end of the century, in particular during the Belle Epoque, living conditions and standards had actually risen. France caught up with the rest of the Western world in terms of its industrialisation and a more cohesive labour movement gradually improved the lot of wage earners. France moved during three major periods during the nineteenth century. We have the July Monarchy, the Second Empire and the Third Republic. There are good regional examples of the different events that form the country’s social history. I particularly enjoyed the details about various industrial regions such as the mining districts and also the variations across the land from North and South. It is a worthy read, even if sometimes this book does get bogged down in detail.

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Review: A Social History of France in the 19th Century – by Christophe Charle

a social history of france

This is a translation from the original French and as such I feel that sometimes reads a little strangely as an academic study in that it sometimes has an unusual technique for presenting ideas. It is quite rich in statistics and sometimes the data can be overwhelming. The book is neatly broken down into chapters which focus on the different effects during multiple time periods on the individual classes which compromised 19th century French society. It is clear that each of the revolutions that occurred during this period, even though often initially driven by the lower classes, all had a tendency to ultimately favour the bourgeois status quo among society’s political elite. Even though peasants and working class often bore the brunt of society’s effects, it is also apparent from the study that by the end of the century, in particular during the Belle Epoque, living conditions and standards had actually risen. France caught up with the rest of the Western world in terms of its industrialisation and a more cohesive labour movement gradually improved the lot of wage earners. France moved during three major periods during the nineteenth century. We have the July Monarchy, the Second Empire and the Third Republic. There are good regional examples of the different events that form the country’s social history. I particularly enjoyed the details about various industrial regions such as the mining districts and also the variations across the land from North and South. It is a worthy read, even if sometimes this book does get bogged down in detail.

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8 Years of Punishment in Cygnet Hospital

gillian grandaughter

PLEASE SIGN THE PETITION   DIABOLICAL: This could happen to YOU: CASE STUDY: E.T. FACTS: Mummy’s Helper: Is like a mum to two younger Brothers. DAILY CHORES: Tidy / Clean, ironing Etc. FREE TIME: 0-5% AGE 14: 2004: RAN AWAY from AGGRESSIVE Dad. HAPPY: Lived with Nan for 6 months. No problems: Punctual √ Honest √ Helpful √ Aggressive X Wants to be a nurse. (Photo, on left, in white top – taken then) FORCED to return to Mum. 2005: RAN AWAY at 10am in PJ’s whilst Mum at work. (REASON: Not known by Nan until 2017): (Fled STEP-DAD’s unwanted sexual advances). NO (statutory) INVESTIGATION DONE WHY she was HOMELESS. She was BLAMED & FALSELY ACCUSED by Mum: “… she is an attention seeking drama queen…” & not questioned by Children’s Services’s Trainee Social Worker (sw). NAN BLAMED by Mum (scape goated): “it’s all her fault.” Nan not questioned by sw. NOT ALLOWED to live with NAN. REFUSED TO GO “HOME”: (Drunk) Mum & sw in Charge of “Plan”: Ensured NO help available to “Force her back home” – police used. ON STREETS approx 3 MONTHS: In TERRIBLE State. Terrified / Forced back to Dad, locked in. Ran away. Terrified / Forced back to Dad again. Ran away. Nan complained (in writing) sw has got it VERY WRONG. Stage 2 Complaint IGNORED by Children’s Services. Nan told “you have no rights – you are only a grandmother.” INCARCERATED for approx 2 MONTHS: DUMPED & Locked IN a disused empty former children’s home, kept in ISOLATION. Only equipment / activity: A snooker table. Promised access to Education by sw but that never happened. CONTACT with Nan restricted. ACCUSED of thumping sw. FOUND GUILTY (at Magistrate’s court). Terrified. Sent to SECURE UNITS in UK, many miles away from family & friends. ISOLATED: Contact with Nan not allowed. Inmate advised: Self Harm to PROTEST UNJUST INCARCERATION. AGE 17: PUT in St ANDREW’s, Northampton, DIAGNOSIS: Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) (has one symptom – self harming; need minimum of 5 symptoms to meet criteria). (Done as label, to invalidate). DETAINED under Mental Health Act, on SECTION 3: “for own safety” (by Children’s Services, before handed over to Adult Services): Placed in care of (Mental Health) CARE MANAGER: NO INVESTIGATION DONE. PUT in Cygnet hospital, Beckton. Transferred to Cygnet hospital, Stevenage: INADEQUATE SAFEGUARDING: 7 YEARS: “ALLOWED to self-harm” by staff, paid for one-one Care. Every protest…

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