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Landlocked – Mental Health in the UK and the Prevention of International Travel, Translation and Foreign Language Education

On the Second of April 1997, at the point of my first contact with the Mental Health Act, I had my life’s dreams shattered. On that day, my parents had been persuaded to take me to see a psychiatrist at the local mental hospital, St Cadoc’s in Caerleon. I hadn’t wanted to attend the meeting at all as I didn’t have any health issues. However, I was forced by my family to go. I spoke with a psychiatrist, a social worker and a GP and they told me that I couldn’t leave the hospital and that I had been placed under Section 2 of the Mental Health Act 1983, a piece of UK government legislation that I had never heard of at all and that I knew nothing about. I was given a bit of paper which told me ‘my rights’ all of which are lies. I had to stay in the hospital for 28 days. I said I can’t do that as I am a university student at University College London (UCL) and also have several business commitments in the Music Industry for my DJing where I have a night at the Ministry of Sound arranged. They said that it was necessary for me to be treated (against my consent) and that afterwards I would be free to get on with my life.   (above is the MOS Flyers for the event which went ahead anyway, just without me there. It was apparently a delusion of grandeur and therefore a symptom of the diagnosed schizophrenia. The shrinks like using this terminology of grandiose delusions for beating you in court appeals etc. Difficult to prove to a shrink anything that you say as they always seem to know better…. [Interestingly my Ltd company was regarded as a Delusion of Grandeur much later in 2002 but I’ll save that story for a future End of Terror article.  ])   I won’t go into the details of what happened to me medically during this time as that is not the subject of this article but eventually I spent between 2 and 3 months locked in Isca Ward, St Cadoc’s, before I was released into the community. The misdiagnosed condition (schizophrenia) which I knew from the start that I didn’t have at all has led to a pursuance by this mental health system of me as an individual for over 22 years. I…

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Landlocked – Mental Health in the UK and the Prevention of International Travel, Translation and Foreign Language Education

air new zealand

On the Second of April 1997, at the point of my first contact with the Mental Health Act, I had my life’s dreams shattered. On that day, my parents had been persuaded to take me to see a psychiatrist at the local mental hospital, St Cadoc’s in Caerleon. I hadn’t wanted to attend the meeting at all as I didn’t have any health issues. However, I was forced by my family to go. I spoke with a psychiatrist, a social worker and a GP and they told me that I couldn’t leave the hospital and that I had been placed under Section 2 of the Mental Health Act 1983, a piece of UK government legislation that I had never heard of at all and that I knew nothing about. I was given a bit of paper which told me ‘my rights’ all of which are lies. I had to stay in the hospital for 28 days. I said I can’t do that as I am a university student at University College London (UCL) and also have several business commitments in the Music Industry for my DJing where I have a night at the Ministry of Sound arranged. They said that it was necessary for me to be treated (against my consent) and that afterwards I would be free to get on with my life.   I won’t go into the details of what happened to me medically during this time as that is not the subject of this article but eventually I spent between 2 and 3 months locked in Isca Ward, St Cadoc’s, before I was released into the community. The misdiagnosed condition (schizophrenia) which I knew from the start that I didn’t have at all has led to a pursuance by this mental health system of me as an individual for over 22 years. I never got to complete my UCL studies and had my music career as a DJ (Wez G) seriously ruined. The End Of Terror website is a solution that I devised to fight my corner in what is in essence a war between myself and elements of the British State.   At the point of realising on 02.04.97, that I wasn’t going to be able to get away from this hospital I had a serious think of the impact it would have on my life. The immediate work and study could be dealt with…

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Brexit y los Jóvenes Británicos

NIGEL FARAGE   La mayoría de jóvenes británicos quiere que la UE sea parte de su futuro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxnqgqOsyJk La salida del Reino Unido de la UE tendrá consecuencias para este país, especialmente para los jóvenes. Explica de qué manera crees que afectará a los jóvenes y al país en general. En tu opinión: ¿por qué crees que la gente votó a favor del Brexit?   Brexit es la decisión del publico británico que ha votado sobre el tema en un referéndum que el país abandona la Unión Europea, su unión aduanera, su libre circulación de personas y sus normas comerciales. Es una decisión muy polémica y no necesariamente ha sido un voto justo porque los jóvenes que votaron abrumadoramente “permanecer” en Europa. Fue la generación antigua de la población y los habitantes de las zonas rurales que votaron a favor de “dejar” y la población joven y urbana estaba a favor de la UE. Hay consecuencias previsibles para los jóvenes, ya que ya no hay viajar libremente por toda Europa en pasaportes británicos ni vivir y trabajar tan fácilmente en el extranjero. Además, tal vez el programa de intercambio Erasmus para la educación universitaria puede verse afectado, aunque se está haciendo mucho para garantizar que Erasmus no se vea afectado por el resultado del referéndum. Creo que en general la gente del Reino Unido sufrirá a través de Brexit. El costo de la vida aumentará. Habrá una notable falta de habitantes multiculturales de Europa que viven en el Reino Unido, lo que conduce a un déficit cultural. Y, lo que es más sorprendente, el voto puede llevar a más votos y la decisión de salir de Europa podría preceder a una ruptura más ominosa del Reino Unido con Escocia, Irlanda del Norte y Gales declarando la independencia. Pienso que la gente decidió por una serie de factores. La campaña de políticos polémicos como Nigel Farage fue muy astuta. El pueblo británico, especialmente a la luz del terrorismo actual, tiene un temor natural a la inmigración. A la gente se le dijo que el dinero ahorrado se gastan en hospitales, aunque sea ha sido expuesto como una mentira. Había mucha confusión sobre Europa y muchas personas no eran realmente conscientes de los efectos de Brexit. Incluso hoy nadie es consciente de lo que realmente resultará de la ruptura definitiva que se produjera cuando finalmente se invocan el artículo 50 del Tratado…

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Working With Languages, MLANG Career Talks, Cardiff University, 08.02.17

  This well attended meeting took place in the Psychology building and welcomed guests from Caerleon Comprehensive – Chloë Samuels and Emma Muggleton, and the European Commission – Paul Kaye, as well as providing information from within MLANG (School of Modern Languages) itself. About 70 students listened and interacted with the presentations over two hours, prior to retiring for Wine and Nibbles. First up was a presentation from the Caerleon Comprehensive School Language department teachers, Chloë Samuels and Emma Muggleton. Chloë is head of the German department there and Emma is overall head of Modern Languages and teaches French. The school is nestled on the outskirts of Newport and is home to over 1600 secondary pupils. Chloë did her degree at Swansea University, spending time abroad in Berlin. Her time abroad inspired her greatly and she decided she would become a teacher of foreign languages. She spoke of the National trend of the decline in foreign languages being bucked by Caerleon Comprehensive, a testament to the success of the languages department there. Chloë and Emma ask the question: Why Teach? Make a difference transferrable skills impact many lives opportunities to advance work anywhere you go Lifelong learning working with teenagers is energising job security holidays are good Everyday is different and you will never be bored Every child is different Autonomy in your classroom give back to the community – watch students grow Express your creativity / personality Humour With respect to why one should specifically teach languages, Chloë suggests: Passions & love of subject ensure students develop a love of language learning inspiring students – making them understand the value of language learning intangible rewards – seeing students achieve, laughing at the funny things they do, supporting, nurturing and helping young people grow Pupil development – from no knowledge to them becoming semi-fluent share cultural knowledge – exploring other cultures Trips abroad – experiencing the student reaction Maintain own language skills They explore the criteria that constitute a good teacher SKILLS Creativity Organisation Dedication Excellent language skills Other subject skills (2 languages often required although not always essential) Sense of humour Able to motivate learners IT Literacy Tenacity They talked about the PGCE teaching certificate and how university courses could be taken to qualify for this. Also mentioning the funding opportunities. More information to be seen here: http://www.getintoteaching.education.gov.uk Both Chloë and Emma were both very inspiring young ladies and…

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Brexit And Translators – Interview with Paul Kaye, European Commission

BREXIT

52% of the British public voted in the Brexit referendum for the UK to leave the European Union. Brexit will have a severe impact on most people’s work and lives. I decided to explore what Brexit means to translators in the UK and managed to catch up with Paul Kaye from the European Commission who kindly supplied Dragon Translate with an interview. Paul Kaye – Language Officer – European Commission Representation in the UK @PaulKayeEUlangs Interviewed by Wesley Gerrard, Dragon Translate, Wednesday, 20th July 2016   What do you do exactly? I work as a language officer with the European Commission. I’m a translator seconded to the European Commission Representation in the UK, where my job is to help promote multilingualism, translation, the language industry, and language learning. There are two of us doing this outreach role, based in London. We do various activities, promoting these kinds of things in the UK, helping to promote them. There are also lots of other organizations working on the same lines. How do you see Brexit changing the role of UK translators? By UK Translators, what do you mean? Well, translators based in the UK and UK national translators abroad. Too early to say for that. I can answer questions about the European Union as an institution, as an organization – but I think, if I understand rightly, you’re asking me to talk about the impact of Brexit on the UK’s wider translation sector. Is that right? Yes. Too early to say for that and I wouldn’t feel qualified, actually, so I can’t answer that one. Ok. How, specifically, will the European Commission, as one of the largest employers of translators and interpreters, respond to Brexit. Again, it’s slightly uncertain. What’s happening now is the UK has to trigger Article 50, as you’ll know from all the coverage. Yes. And so, once that happens, the negotiations start. Until then the UK is a member of the European Union, well in fact, until the negotiations conclude and the UK withdraws the UK is a member. In one sense things just carry on as normal. In the translation service, the fate of UK nationals who are working for the EU institutions – that will be part of the negotiations between the UK and the EU – again too early to say for that. Once the UK does leave it will be highly unlikely that any new UK nationals…

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Brexit and Mental Health

brexit

Brexit, like it or not is a reality. 54% of the public voted in a referendum for us to leave the EU. I watched with despair as events unfolded and was almost praying for us to stay in as I feared that a Brexit decision could really send my End Of Terror situation spiralling out of control. Post-Brexit, if I believed in restricting people’s liberties for thought crime and nowt else and I had the power as a psychiatrist, then maybe I’d be sentencing 54% of the population for section detainment in mental hospitals for making a completely irrational decision in voting, a decision I believe that long term will make the entire UK suffer, economically, politically and more importantly, to End Of Terror, within the mental health system. Why the big fear, you may ask? Firstly, one of the core components of EU membership is that EU citizens have access to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. This court, although I’ve never used it personally, acts as a safeguard for human rights. I’ve always dreamed of getting over to Strasbourg and felt that it would be one of the only places in which to get justice for End Of Terror. I will never realise that goal. But,many good things have come from Strasbourg over the years and indirectly it has safeguarded all those unnecessarily under the cosh, detained in UK mental health institutions. One piece of legislation that has been delivered through the presence of the EU Human Rights Court, is our own country’s Human Rights Act (1998). This Act came into being under the supervision of the Tony Blair government and basically enshrined EU Human Rights legislation into British Law. I have always felt that the Human Rights Act is incompatible with the Mental Health Act. The fundamental freedoms it enshrines are usurped once the Mental Health Act is invoked. I have constantly tried to argue a Human Rights case for myself, even in the Mental Health Tribunal Courts, quoting the United Nations Universal Declaration on Human Rights and referring to Strasbourg and indeed the Human Rights Act. Most debate, however, falls on deaf ears, and the tribunal courts tend to favour the misplaced incorrect mindset of Mental Health Workers who generally claim that the Mental Health Act is more important than any human rights legislation and overrides it. Treatment against consent is my main bugbear…

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