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Brexit And Translators – Interview with Paul Kaye, European Commission

BREXIT

52% of the British public voted in the Brexit referendum for the UK to leave the European Union. Brexit will have a severe impact on most people’s work and lives. I decided to explore what Brexit means to translators in the UK and managed to catch up with Paul Kaye from the European Commission who kindly supplied Dragon Translate with an interview. Paul Kaye – Language Officer – European Commission Representation in the UK @PaulKayeEUlangs Interviewed by Wesley Gerrard, Dragon Translate, Wednesday, 20th July 2016   What do you do exactly? I work as a language officer with the European Commission. I’m a translator seconded to the European Commission Representation in the UK, where my job is to help promote multilingualism, translation, the language industry, and language learning. There are two of us doing this outreach role, based in London. We do various activities, promoting these kinds of things in the UK, helping to promote them. There are also lots of other organizations working on the same lines. How do you see Brexit changing the role of UK translators? By UK Translators, what do you mean? Well, translators based in the UK and UK national translators abroad. Too early to say for that. I can answer questions about the European Union as an institution, as an organization – but I think, if I understand rightly, you’re asking me to talk about the impact of Brexit on the UK’s wider translation sector. Is that right? Yes. Too early to say for that and I wouldn’t feel qualified, actually, so I can’t answer that one. Ok. How, specifically, will the European Commission, as one of the largest employers of translators and interpreters, respond to Brexit. Again, it’s slightly uncertain. What’s happening now is the UK has to trigger Article 50, as you’ll know from all the coverage. Yes. And so, once that happens, the negotiations start. Until then the UK is a member of the European Union, well in fact, until the negotiations conclude and the UK withdraws the UK is a member. In one sense things just carry on as normal. In the translation service, the fate of UK nationals who are working for the EU institutions – that will be part of the negotiations between the UK and the EU – again too early to say for that. Once the UK does leave it will be highly unlikely that any new UK nationals…

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Polysystems And Postcolonialism

Itamar-Even-Zohar

Polysystems and Postcolonialism by William Wesley Gerrard 02.06.16 ML8101 – INTRODUCTION TO TRANSLATION THEORY – Alternative Assessment – ID: C1473322 CANDIDATE NAME: William Wesley Gerrard STUDENT NUMBER: c1473322 MODULE CODE: ML8101 MODULE TITLE: Introduction to Translation Theory SEMINAR TUTOR: Dr Carlos Sanz-Mingo ESSAY TITLE / COURSEWORK ASSIGNMENT: Polysystems and Postcolonialism – Alternative Assessment WORD COUNT: 1537   It has been argued that unequal power relationships between languages, countries, cultures and polysystems have important implications for translation. Discuss, making reference to at least one approach from lectures, and provide at least one example. Translation is at the heart of international relations, hence power differentials are always abundant as translators work. As Venuti identifies there tends to be a potential violence in the interactions: ‘The violent effects of translation are felt at home as well as abroad. On the one hand, translation wields enormous power in the construction of identities for foreign cultures, and hence it potentially figures in ethnic discrimination, geopolitical confrontations, colonialism, terrorism, war. On the other hand, translation enlists the foreign text in the maintenance or revision of literary canons in the receiving culture, inscribing poetry and fiction, for example, with the various poetic, narrative, and ideological discourses that compete for cultural dominance in the translating language.’ Venuti (2008:14) This essay will explore the relationships between the entities using polysystem theory and also by focussing on postcolonialsim and its effects. In bringing in examples, the differing power relationships between languages will be identified with a particular focus on the role of translators within society. Itamar Even-Zohar Polysystem theory was created by Israeli scholar, Itamar Even-Zohar, in the 1970s, based on the ideas of the Russian Formalists of the 1920s and the Czech structuralists of the 1930s and 1940s. ‘According to Even-Zohar’s model, the polysystem is conceived as a heterogeneous, hierarchized conglomerate (or system) of systems which interact to bring about an ongoing, dynamic process of evolution within the polysystem as a whole.’ Shuttleworth in Baker & Saldanha (2009:197) Translation holds a key role within polysystem theory and the works of translators are at the heart as well as the periphery of the polysystems Even-Zohar identifies: ‘Translation is no longer a phenomenon whose nature and borders are given once and for all, but an activity dependant on the relations within a certain cultural system.’ Even-Zohar (1990:51) Within a polysystem, varying forms of literature and media form separate subsystems, translations having…

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Review: In Other Words – A Coursebook On Translation – by Mona Baker

in other words

This Mona Baker book is a core text on my Translation (MA) at Cardiff University. We use the text to accompany the Translation Methods Course. The early chapter of equivalence at word level and how to translate non equivalence is particularly interesting, useful and a strong section of the well-written precise coursebook. On occasion there is perhaps an abundance of examples although Baker covers a range of different languages, often straying into non-European, non-standard foreign tongues. In this new edition there is a valuable additional chapter on Ethics and Morality. This is a fashionable area of current Translation research. I feel that the book is an essential read for anyone considering Translation as a profession or those who study it at degree level. To a lay reader, perhaps the in depth detail is a bit profound. However, the book remains very accessible and is an ideal entry level text for students. This book will be well-thumbed in my reference section.

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Cardiff student tells of sectioning nightmare – from Gair Rhydd – Cardiff University student newspaper

gairrhydd

Cardiff student tells of sectioning nightmare Posted in News by Alexander Norton on March 3, 2015 http://cardiffstudentmedia.co.uk/gairrhydd/news/cardiff-student-tells-sectioning-nightmare/ A mature student has revealed to Gair Rhydd details of eighteen turbulent years as a mental health patient. Wesley Gerrard, 37, is currently studying Translation at Cardiff University’s School of Modern Languages – but for nearly two decades his academic career has been disrupted by a series of detainments. Gerrard claimed that his extensive experiences with the system have been far from positive and provoked him to set up the campaign site ‘endofterror.org’. The site aims to raise awareness of his experiences – but this in itself has brought him problems. “As soon as I started publishing stories on ‘endofterror’, I’ve had major police involvement. I came to realise it was dangerous to publish this sort of thing,” he said. In all, the part-time DJ claimed to have been sectioned under the Mental Health Act on “fifteen to twenty” occasions. He claimed that his encounters with mental health services started when he was studying for an undergraduate degree in Geography at University College London in 1997. “I ran into some trouble in London and when I came home, my parents forced me to go to an outpatient appointment. “Since then I haven’t really progressed or gotten out of the system.” He said that he was discouraged from undertaking further education by the fact that they “wouldn’t let me out of hospital to complete my exams [and] sectioned me whilst I was preparing my dissertation”. Despite this, he re-entered higher education with the Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning in around 2008, and subsequently progressed to undertake a full degree. However, he still had encounters with mental health authorities – until an academic “would not accept me pulling out of classes and put me in touch with disability advisor.” “They said: ‘enough is enough, we’re not going to have this student’s life ruined anymore’. It made me very happy knowing I was going to get some protection from Cardiff University.” The University’s intervention reportedly caused the mental health authorities to “lay off me”, and despite averaging a sectioning a year he came to an agreement with mental health authorities “not to disrupt his studies for three years”. However, over the festive period he once again found himself incarcerated at St. Caldcot’s Hospital – and was accused by the authorities of having delusions over his status…

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History Of Translation

etienne dolet

[INTRODUCTION TO TRANSLATION THEORY – Coursework Essay] Various scholars have highlighted the importance of translation history. To what extent would you agree and why? Discuss and exemplify, making reference to at least two theorists.   Translation history mimics history itself. Any post-Babel relationship between tribes, nations, continents, peoples, involves translation and translators as different cultures possess different tongues. Relationships across time involve translators and interpreters to intermediate and add to the charms of civilization. ‘It is not too difficult to see how translators throughout their history have acted as both guardians and traders. They have acted both as the zealous elaborators and protectors of national languages and literatures and as the indispensable intermediaries in the opening up of the world to the circulation of commodities, people and ideas.’ Cronin (2003:70) From war to famine, dispersion of knowledge, empire building, conquest, religious missionaries, all aspects of what we know as history involves translation. In this essay I aim to isolate a few key critical moments in the history of translation and to identify key people who have paved the way for translators in the modern world. French postage stamp depicting the translation martyr, Étienne Dolet   One of the most interesting characters in the history of translation is Étienne Dolet. A French translator, Dolet aligned himself against the modus operandi. His dissidence, obviously backed with intellectual strength and passionate commitment to his work, made him persona non grata with the leading educational establishment in France. The Sorbonne would be the natural enemy of Dolet and as powerful and intimidating as it was, the battle could only ever end in defeat for the individual. Dolet, as an intellectual, formed part of the Ciceronian group of translation scholars. They believed that Latin should be written in the ancient style of Roman orators and writers such as Cicero; a classical Latin. They disagreed with the church-influenced modern Latin, en vogue with scholars such as Erasmus and the predominant style of European writing and thinking. Dolet was a purist and felt that the original Latin thinkers and creators of the language and its culture were not misdirected by the linguistic needs of the later movement that was Christianity. Ultimately, this passion for classicism led Dolet to the stake. Religion was taken seriously in the Middle Ages and blasphemy was a heinous offense. In his efforts to translate Plato, Dolet, paid no heed to the Christian…

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Student Rep Meeting with Head of MLANG, Cardiff University, 10.12.14

MLANG, Cardiff University

On 10th December I attended a meeting with Head of MLANG School, Professor Claire Gorrara. She was giving a presentation about developments in the school and there followed a Q&A session. As student rep for first year Translation I felt that I would take this opportunity to briefly report on this meeting to the students. Claire began by stating the strategic vision for MLANG. It is: ‘Laying the foundations for learning and teaching, research and impact and international engagement within our new school’. MLANG is a new department that consolidates the teaching of foreign languages at Cardiff University. The old EUROP makes way for MLANG. Politics moves departments and the school incorporates Japanese that was previously taught at the Business School. The foreign languages taught to 4000 adult learners at Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning (LEARN) are drawn into MLANG and the new school allows for an expansion in languages, introducing Portuguese to the main degree program this year with a full degree in Mandarin Chinese (in partnership with Beijing Normal University) to follow in 2016. It was an interesting footnote for us, as translation students, that the translation department is the big success story for MLANG. Enrollment of Translation courses is massively increasing year on year and the future of this section looks very bright. The trend of students to want Translation courses means that this is a growth area and the demand will be met with supply. One of the key challenges to MLANG has been the new Languages for All (LFA) program. This has been introduced as a university-wide scheme, allowing ALL students access to free teaching of foreign languages to compliment their degree studies. The enthusiasm of students for LFA in its inaugural year has been overwhelming with over 2000 attempting to enroll for the only 900 places that were available. There are plans to increase capacity of LFA in future years. The business school will be made available for teaching after 5pm, expanding classroom space and more tutors will be brought in. At the start of the year, 54% of MLANG classes were to occur in the MLANG building. Due to this area being an amalgamated piecing together of old Victorian family houses, it has been acknowledged that it isn’t the best of spaces. Due to disability access issues, many of the classrooms towards the rear of the building have been unfit for teaching use…

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Taking Stock of Subtitling – Jorge Díaz-Cintas (UCL) – Guest Lecture Cardiff University MLANG 18.11.14

Jorge Díaz-Cintas

Sponsored by Tesserae, Journal of Iberian and Latin American Studies, this event at Cardiff University brought in world expert in subtitling, Jorge Díaz-Cintas, from UCL, for a guest lecture on ‘Taking Stock In Subtitling’. Subtitling is a growing area of research and also a growing employment area for Translation graduates. The lecture was well-supported by undergraduate and post-graduate students, many department teachers, the professional translator community and also members of the public. Jorge led out by defining subtitling as a form of REWRITING as opposed to the REVOICING of dubbing, interpreting, voiceover and narration. Subtitling has a very significant role in accessibility, with subtitles being made for disabled people, be they hard of hearing / deaf or partially-sighted / blind (Audio description & Audio subtitling) The rapid development in technology in recent years has seen a huge growth in the need for subtitling. Its diversity and range has multiplied with the advent of new technologies and has moved from television to the internet. The volunteer community of subtitlers translate and adapt uploaded videos on youtube and other internet video platforms, sometimes, as in the case of new TV series, beating the professional subtitling community in the race for reaching an audience. These new subtitlers can redefine norms in the world of translation, for example, usurping traditional translation methods for Mandarin or Arabic and using trendy vernacular tongues. Jorge demonstrated some of the professional subtitling computer tools such as Wincaps, and talked of the complexity of organising multiple subtitling in a range of foreign languages. If ‘spotting’ (where subtitles come in and fade out in a video frame) is made uniform across all subtitling languages, what sort of problems can arise? A German translator needs far more space in their translation than other European languages as their words are longer and also the sentences are structured with the verb part-separating to feature at the end of a sentence. A subtitler has to take into account of average reading speeds and faces the challenge of condensing material due to space restraints. Jorge showed how the software aids in these factors. For those interested in subtitling and getting involved in this profession, a number of websites were mentioned: http://esist.org/ http://avteurope.eu/ http://subtitlers.org.uk/ http://clipfair.net http://videolectures.net http://ted.com http://www.eu-bridge.eu/ http://www.sumat-project.eu/ Some of these sites are at the cutting edge of subtitling technology, incorporating the latest developments in the field of machine translation. Jorge left us to ponder…

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Shuffle Show – XPress Radio – WEEK 5 – 30.11.14

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  The Shuffle Show with Wez G – WEEK 5 – 30.11.14 – XPress Radio This week’s Shuffle Show on XPress Radio hosts guest DJ, from the Woodville, Cathays, James Alexander aka Apollo Chief. :::TRACKLISTING::: 1. GL – Won’t You See (Gerd Janson Dub Mix) [Plastic World] 2. Kasper Bjorke – Rush feat. Tobias Buch (Pink Skull Remix) [Hafendisko] 3. Soul Clap – Misty feat. Robert Owens (Louie Vega Roots NYC Mix) [Soul Clap Records] 4. James Alexander, Apollo Chief – XPress Radio Interview – PART 1 5. Mr. Tophat, Art Alfie – Marlboro Light (GW Remix) [Karlovak] 6. Westbam, Nena – Oldschool Baby (Piano Mix) [KNM] 7. James Alexander, Apollo Chief – XPress Radio Interview – PART 2 8. James Alexander, Apollo Chief – SHUFFLE XPRESS MINIMIX 9. So Inagawa – De Facto [O.P. Disc] 10. Radio Diffusion – BHVL (MOSTA Remix) [Compost Records] 11. Celcius – Incoming (Original Mix) [MadTech] 12. Unit 7 – Down (Original Mix) [WRHS Music] 13. Celcius – Devotion (Original Mix) [Madtech] 14. Freakme – Soultice (Original Mix) [Electronique Nu] 15. LouLou Players & Kolombo – Don’t Go Away (Zombie Disco Squad Remix) [SUARA] 16. Claude VonStroke – Who’s Afraid of Detroit (Original Mix) [Dirtybird] The Shuffle Show is broadcast every Saturday Night / Sunday Morning from Midnight to 1am on Xpress Radio, Cardiff University’s award-winning student radio station http://xpressradio.co.uk MORE JAMES ALEXANDER, APOLLO CHIEF: https://soundcloud.com/jacquesuk Shuffle Show – XPress Radio – WEEK 5 – 30.11.14 – James Alexander, Apollo Chief by Wez G on Mixcloud SHUFFLE SHOW ARCHIVE

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Shuffle Show – XPress Radio – WEEK 4 – 23.11.14

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  The Shuffle Show with Wez G – WEEK 4 – 23.11.14 – XPress Radio This week’s Shuffle Show on Xpress Radio hosts Funkydory’s Gari Worner. Gari has worked as a DJ in the Welsh capital for many years and his style perfectly sums up the flavour of Cardiff’s clubscene. :::TRACKLISTING::: 1. Opus III – It’s A Fine Day [PWL International] 2. Röyksopp – This Must Be It (Rex The Dog K-Dart Remix) [Wall Of Sound] 3. Sandee – Notice Me [Fever Records] 4. Gari Worner – XPress Radio Interview – PART 1 5. Rob Mirage, DJ Chus – Back 2 NY (Original Stereo Mix) [Strictly Rhythm] 6. COMA – Los Dilettantes (Roosevelt Mix) [Bedrock Records] 7. Gari Worner – XPress Radio Interview – PART 2 8. Gari Worner – SHUFFLE XPRESS MINIMIX 9. Boris Dlugosch & Roisin Murphy – Never Enough  (Drop Out Orchestra Remix) [Super Sexy Disco Vol 1] 10. Da Sunlounge – Fly Girl (island Knights Original Mix) [Borrowed Music] 11. Da Sunlounge – Stronger (Original Mix) [Borrowed Music] 12. Drop Out Orchestra – Red Beans (Original Mix) [File Under Disco] 13. Larry Fives – Make A Move (Original Mix)) [House Bound] 14. Roland Clark – A House Thing (Micky Moore & Andy Tee Deep Mix) 15. TW Funkmasters – Love Money (Joey Negro Dub Wise Revision – Remixed With Love) [Z Records] The Shuffle Show is broadcast every Saturday Night / Sunday Morning from Midnight to 1am on Xpress Radio, Cardiff University’s award-winning student radio station http://xpressradio.co.uk MORE Gari Worner / Funkydory: https://soundcloud.com/gjworner Shuffle Show – XPress Radio – WEEK 4 – 23.11.14 – Gari Worner From Funkydory by Wez G on Mixcloud SHUFFLE SHOW ARCHIVE

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Shuffle Show – XPress Radio – WEEK 3 – 16.11.14

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  The Shuffle Show with Wez G – WEEK 3 – 16.11.14 – XPress Radio This week’s Shuffle Show on Xpress Radio sees host Wez G joined by Fran from Traffic, Cardiff University’s underground clubbing and Djing society. Also from Traffic, guest DJ Dom Varndell spins a minimix. :::TRACKLISTING::: 1. Scan X – Midnight (Laurent Garnier Edit) [WTF! Music] 2. Soulik – Enjoy This Trip (Original Mix) [Audio Elite] 3. Fran from Traffic – XPress Radio Interview 4. Be.Lanuit – En El Aire [Lovely Mood Music] 5. Ost & Kjex – Have You Seen The Moon In Dallas? (Maurice Fulton Remix) [Planet Noise] 6. Dom Varndell – XPress Radio Interview 7. Dom Varndell – SHUFFLE XPRESS MINIMIX 8. Callaghan – Deep Down [White] 9. Mak & Pasteman – Drowning [Naked Naked Records] 10. Fatboy Slim – Star 69 (Myles James Bootleg) [White] 11. Codec – Is It Something [WRHSmusic] 12. Alex Parkin – Nasty Thing (Original Mix) [Roska Kicks & Snares] 13. Huxley – Creeper (Club) [Aus Music] 14. Furesshu – Lifted (Shifted Remix) [Project Squared] 15. BareSkin – Eyes (Original Mix) [Hypercolour] 16. My Nu Leng ft. Fox – Masterplan [Black Butter Records] The Shuffle Show is broadcast every Saturday Night / Sunday Morning from Midnight to 1am on Xpress Radio, Cardiff University’s award-winning student radio station http://xpressradio.co.uk MORE: TRAFFIC https://www.facebook.com/pages/TRAFFIC-Clubbing-DJing-Society/26894748270 DOM VARNDELL https://soundcloud.com/domvarndell http://www.mixcloud.com/DomVarndell/ Shuffle Show – XPress Radio – WEEK 3 – 16.11.14 – Fran from Traffic & Dom Varndell by Wez G on Mixcloud SHUFFLE SHOW ARCHIVE

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Positioning Translators – Theo Hermans (UCL) – Guest Lecture Cardiff University MLANG 29.10.14

theo hermans

  Theo Hermans is from University College London (UCL) and works in translation studies and in modern and Renaissance Dutch literature. His guest lecture at Cardiff University was to develop his ideas in his recent ‘Positioning Translators’ paper. Theo edits the series Translation Theories Explored published by Routledge. This was my first extra-curricular lecture at Cardiff University. We prepared for the lecture with a seminar in the afternoon run by my personal tutor, Dorota Goluch. I’d read Theo’s paper and it had been a little profound for me to take it all in yet after Dorota’s seminar I was feeling a little more confident in understanding the idea of ‘Positioning Translators’ and was ready fro the main event. Theo Hermans entered a jam-packed MLANG lecture theatre and under the light of recording video cameras, got his talk underway. Many of the ideas and examples were taken straight from the paper, but Theo had an excellent way of simplifying the ideas and making them more accessible in the lecture than they were in the plain text of the paper. He started with the example of Antjie Krog, a SoutH African translator who was deeply emotionally affected by his interpreting work for the South African Truth And Reconciliation commission as it sought to uncover the wrongs of apartheid. He talked of First Person Displacement – the way in which a translator or interpreter can get caught up in their work. Antjie Krog found that by referring to the unjust crimes as he interpreting them by using the first-person, he could not separate his won identity from the dark sins perpetuated by the more evil elements of the apartheid instigators. The lecture went on to develop how translators themselves are affected in their work and the various techniques they use to impose themselves on the reader. I think one of the biggest ideas that embedded in my mind from Theo’s talk was the nature of Irony in Translation. In a translated work there is not just a single voice talking. The author has his voice but the translator, in his work, has his own voice represented in the work. There is therefore two voices present, struggling against each other – the element of irony where the nature of what is being said has a duality. Different translators cope with this irony in different ways. Is the perfect translation where the translator is invisible? The…

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Shuffle Show – Xpress Radio – WEEK 1 – 02.11.14

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  The Shuffle Show with Wez G – WEEK 1 – 02.11.14 – XPress Radio The inaugural Shuffle Show on Xpress Radio has some nice cuts of house served up by Wez G plus an interview with Time Flies promoter, Henry Blunt and superstar DJ, Jon Pleased Wimmin. :::TRACKLISTING::: 1. X-Press 2 – Tranz Euro Xpress (The Ride) [Junior Boys Own] 2. Josh One – Contemplation (King Britt Funke Mix) [Hot Tracks] 3. Lexicon Avenue – Psycho Killer [White] 4. Henry Blunt – Xpress Radio Interview 5. Justine – Be Sexy (Sexy Vocal Mix) [UMM] 6. Jon Pleased Wimmin – Passion (A Tin Tin Out Mix) [Perfecto] 7. Jon Pleased Wimmin – Xpress Radio Interview 8. Depeche Mode – Precious (Sasha’s Gargantuan Vocal Mix) [Mute] 9. John Monkman – L.O.V.E.R. (Hallo Halo Remix) [Be Crazy Music] The Shuffle Show is broadcast every Saturday Night / Sunday Morning from Midnight to 1am on Xpress Radio, Cardiff University’s award-winning student radio station http://xpressradio.co.uk MORE: TIME FLIES http://www.timefliesuk.com/ JON PLEASED WIMMIN: https://soundcloud.com/jon-pleased Shuffle Show – Xpress Radio – WEEK 1 – 02.11.14 – Henry Blunt & Jon Pleased Wimmin by Wez G on Mixcloud SHUFFLE SHOW ARCHIVE

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NEW: The Shuffle Show with Wez G – Xpress Radio – Saturdays/Sundays Midnight -1am

xpress logo

The Shuffle Show is a specialist Dance Music show on Xpress Radio, airing 12am – 1am Sundays (late Saturday night). XPress Radio is the award-winning Cardiff University radio station. I have recently gone back to my studies as a full-time Translation student at Cardiff. I thought that while I was there that I would try to keep the music at a minimum but I couldn’t resist going along to check out a few societies. I went to the Xpress radio meeting and couldn’t believe that there were about 150 people in attendance. I’ve worked in radio for many years, in particular with KryKey (web radio), and I felt that traditional radio was dying or dead, a forgotten medium in the world of podcasts and technology. When I originally went to UCL about twenty years ago, their radio station, Rare FM, was far more rudimentary…. I felt filled with hope about Xpress and, with my new partner-in-crime, Brummie Todd, we decided to put plans into place for a new show. I’ve been dabbling around recently with the Wez G Sessions. This was a ‘traditional style’ radio broadcast, with talking (a broadcast skill I am really no good at!). I aimed, with the Wez G sessions, just to raise my basic skill levels, work with Ableton in a set format, and to provide decent content in bulk for the KryKey network and also for the Caldicot Community Radio station which I was in talks with the council about resurrecting. The Wez G sessions was never a really serious project, though I have enjoyed making it so far, and love listening myself… I haven’t gone hell-for-leather on promoting it (just yet!) and am hoping that people will eventually start tuning in of their own, natural, accord. The Wez G Sessions have been good practice for a potential Xpress show so I thought I would kick on and try and grab a primetime slot, and bring my music to a new, youthful student audience. Todd and I went in for an interview and I rather arrogantly expected us to be given a show as a matter of formality. At the initial session, when they were showing us how to use decks, I was the only person with actual DJ experience. In January 2015 it will be twenty years of my professional DJ career. Surely a show on Xpress would be a breeze? Unfortunately for Todd and…

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Review: The Politics of Translation in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

The Politics of Translation in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski My rating: 4 of 5 stars I discovered this book in the Cardiff University library and thought it would provide a valuable insight into translation in history. I am interested in general history of the Renaissance and Middle Ages and found that this book helped to transfer pre-existing knowledge to the field of Translation. The book is a selection of academic papers from primarily North American institutes, There seemed to be a lot of emphasis on the French language as a vernacular and also, more obviously, Latin. I suppose that this reflects the importance of French as a cultural language at the time. It precedes English as the global lingua franca by some distance. The general introduction chapters were very useful in terms of setting into context the role of translation during the epoque and the political implications that a translator would consider. The stand out chapter for me introduces the subject of Etienne Dolet, a translation martyr who was sentenced to death and executed as a result of his work. The Dolet tale was an intriguing one and demonstrates clearly how a target-language’s cultural attitudes have to be taken into consideration when working as a translator. I feel that Dolet is a person upon whom I would like to follow up research throughout the course of my Translation degree. I am a keen fan of Montaigne and it had previously eluded me that a lot of his great work was inspired by his activities as a translator. There are two chapters covering his translation of Raimond Sebond and the detailed critique that has ensued regarding the fidelity of his translation and the speculation of the true political motives behind his methodology. I think that very often, in translation, some of the reasoning and suppositions of translation critics fail to address the actual linguistical differences between foreign tongues. There are massive style changes at work that are bound to change the register of the original author and the translator would often introduce new ideas and themes only at a subliminal level, although that could very reasonably be done within the culture and political / historic climate of the current prevailing target-culture. This book covers a wide variety of other topics, some of which are more relevant and interesting than others. I enjoyed The Alfredan Boethius chapter….

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Dragon Translate: An Introduction

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  I am Wesley Gerrard. I am a 36 year old male who has worked in music for most of his life. I have always had a passion for languages. From the age of about 13 I used to spend every summer alone with a French family in the southwest of Aquitaine where I learnt to speak that beautiful language well. I also studied Spanish in school. I received the maximum grades of A in French GCSE, a in French O Level and A* in GCSE Spanish. After leaving school I maintained an interest in languages, speaking Spanish and French wherever possible. At the age of about 25 I decided to go back to college and in a year at Coleg Gwent, Newport, I passed an A Level French with an A grade and AS level Spanish with an A grade also. Seven years ago I was drawn to studying at the Cardiff Centre For Lifelong Learning. At LEARN there were plenty of language night classes to choose from and I decided to diversify my experience of foreign languages and have taken courses there in French, Spanish, Italian, German, Arabic, Russian and Mandarin Chinese. The staff at LEARN persuaded me to take the Pathways to a degree scheme and as of September 2014 I am embarking on a full-time Translation (BA) at Cardiff University through Pathways. My aim is to retrain as a professional translator and move from a career in music into a new interesting work environment. Hopefully I will get a good degree qualification and further necessary professional qualifications. I aim to specialise in translation from Spanish and French into English but I am also open to working with other foreign languages. I am keen on the tech environment and the possibilities of machine translation and CAT (Computer-Aided Translation) excite me a lot. Dragon Translate is my new business, built in anticipation of the future work I intend to do. First up is getting the degree and then I guess, Dragon Translate will seek to work as a Translation service. Ideally we can partner up with a larger agency to gain work. We hope to build up a good reputation in this new market and deliver high quality work. I’d like to work in the field of entertainment, an area I know well, though am open to all areas and have a wide general knowledge that could be…

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Review: Becoming a Translator: An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Translation

Becoming a Translator: An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Translation by Douglas Robinson My rating: 4 of 5 stars This is another book I’ve read in preparation for the Translation (BA) at Cardiff University on which I’m about to embark. This book aims not so much at the theories of Translation Studies as in other textbooks I have read but focuses more on life as a professional translator. It is preparation for the world of work and discusses many of the issues which one might encounter if one is successful in this career choice. The book has its own ideas and it does perhaps over-apply its terminologies of pattern-building and intuitive leaps. I found it a bit wishy-washy in places as I am still very new to the ideas of Translation. It is easy enough to understand as a basic concept yet the actual science of translation can be quite complicated. There are some nice, practical exercises at the end of each chapter which are good food for thought. I think that this book was a good introduction to translation and I can see it being a useful source of reference for me in years to come. View all my reviews

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Review: Introducing Translation Studies: Theories and Applications

Introducing Translation Studies: Theories and Applications by Jeremy Munday My rating: 4 of 5 stars Ahead of embarking upon a Translation (BA) at Cardiff University, I thought I’d prepare by investigating one of the course textbooks. This introduction to Translation Studies was a revelation in how it introduced me to the new terminology I will be working with. I initially found the introduction of new models and ways of thinking a little daunting, but by the end of chapter twelve I felt that I was making progress in understanding the general gists of translation studies. The chapter on machine translation was the most appealing to me and I see this as an area in which I might specialise. The case studies at the end of each chapter were particularly thought-provoking and useful in allowing you to grasp the concepts at discussion in each chapter. I felt that this book was an ideal way to anticipate my future degree and I look forward to referring back to this text as my studies progress. View all my reviews

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Review: Is That a Fish in Your Ear? The Amazing Adventure of Translation

Is That a Fish in Your Ear? The Amazing Adventure of Translation by David Bellos My rating: 5 of 5 stars I am starting a degree in Translation at Cardiff University next year and I thought I would try to get to grip with this new endeavour by learning a bit more about the art and science of Translation Studies. David Bellos is a professional with an obvious passion for languages. His book is most interesting and covers a very wide range of areas, neatly categorised into concise chapters which flow together seamlessly. The history of Translation opened my eyes and really build on the often misconceived notions a non-specialist may have on Translation. The book was full of very interesting and educated anecdotes which were often humorous and always memorable. I found the development of machine translation most intriguing and the different roles of translators in the modern world was well-covered. It is very surprising how the English language is represented globally and its dominance as a global lingua franca produces some bizarre skews for the world of translation. there is a dearth of foreign language speakers with English mother-tongue which is one reason why I am studying the Translation degree. This introductory book has really inspired me and convinced me that I am on the right course. I feel motivated by the wide range of possibilities further study in this area could bring. I think that it is a most wise study and I can see that this book will become well-thumbed as a reference-point for me in the future. I don’t reread many books but I can certainly see me repeating this work. View all my reviews

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