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Working With Languages, MLANG Career Talks, Cardiff University, 08.02.17

  This well attended meeting took place in the Psychology building and welcomed guests from Caerleon Comprehensive – Chloë Samuels and Emma Muggleton, and the European Commission – Paul Kaye, as well as providing information from within MLANG (School of Modern Languages) itself. About 70 students listened and interacted with the presentations over two hours, prior to retiring for Wine and Nibbles. First up was a presentation from the Caerleon Comprehensive School Language department teachers, Chloë Samuels and Emma Muggleton. Chloë is head of the German department there and Emma is overall head of Modern Languages and teaches French. The school is nestled on the outskirts of Newport and is home to over 1600 secondary pupils. Chloë did her degree at Swansea University, spending time abroad in Berlin. Her time abroad inspired her greatly and she decided she would become a teacher of foreign languages. She spoke of the National trend of the decline in foreign languages being bucked by Caerleon Comprehensive, a testament to the success of the languages department there. Chloë and Emma ask the question: Why Teach? Make a difference transferrable skills impact many lives opportunities to advance work anywhere you go Lifelong learning working with teenagers is energising job security holidays are good Everyday is different and you will never be bored Every child is different Autonomy in your classroom give back to the community – watch students grow Express your creativity / personality Humour With respect to why one should specifically teach languages, Chloë suggests: Passions & love of subject ensure students develop a love of language learning inspiring students – making them understand the value of language learning intangible rewards – seeing students achieve, laughing at the funny things they do, supporting, nurturing and helping young people grow Pupil development – from no knowledge to them becoming semi-fluent share cultural knowledge – exploring other cultures Trips abroad – experiencing the student reaction Maintain own language skills They explore the criteria that constitute a good teacher SKILLS Creativity Organisation Dedication Excellent language skills Other subject skills (2 languages often required although not always essential) Sense of humour Able to motivate learners IT Literacy Tenacity They talked about the PGCE teaching certificate and how university courses could be taken to qualify for this. Also mentioning the funding opportunities. More information to be seen here: http://www.getintoteaching.education.gov.uk Both Chloë and Emma were both very inspiring young ladies and…

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Positioning Translators – Theo Hermans (UCL) – Guest Lecture Cardiff University MLANG 29.10.14

theo hermans

  Theo Hermans is from University College London (UCL) and works in translation studies and in modern and Renaissance Dutch literature. His guest lecture at Cardiff University was to develop his ideas in his recent ‘Positioning Translators’ paper. Theo edits the series Translation Theories Explored published by Routledge. This was my first extra-curricular lecture at Cardiff University. We prepared for the lecture with a seminar in the afternoon run by my personal tutor, Dorota Goluch. I’d read Theo’s paper and it had been a little profound for me to take it all in yet after Dorota’s seminar I was feeling a little more confident in understanding the idea of ‘Positioning Translators’ and was ready fro the main event. Theo Hermans entered a jam-packed MLANG lecture theatre and under the light of recording video cameras, got his talk underway. Many of the ideas and examples were taken straight from the paper, but Theo had an excellent way of simplifying the ideas and making them more accessible in the lecture than they were in the plain text of the paper. He started with the example of Antjie Krog, a SoutH African translator who was deeply emotionally affected by his interpreting work for the South African Truth And Reconciliation commission as it sought to uncover the wrongs of apartheid. He talked of First Person Displacement – the way in which a translator or interpreter can get caught up in their work. Antjie Krog found that by referring to the unjust crimes as he interpreting them by using the first-person, he could not separate his won identity from the dark sins perpetuated by the more evil elements of the apartheid instigators. The lecture went on to develop how translators themselves are affected in their work and the various techniques they use to impose themselves on the reader. I think one of the biggest ideas that embedded in my mind from Theo’s talk was the nature of Irony in Translation. In a translated work there is not just a single voice talking. The author has his voice but the translator, in his work, has his own voice represented in the work. There is therefore two voices present, struggling against each other – the element of irony where the nature of what is being said has a duality. Different translators cope with this irony in different ways. Is the perfect translation where the translator is invisible? The…

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