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On The Verge of being MURDERED by Gwent Police

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I’ve been TAKEN or Kidnapped by Gwent Police in advance of the Mental Health Act being invoked and being compulsorily detained in Mental Hospitals on approximately 40-50 occasions by now. It’s just prevented any real flow of liberty in almost anything I do from education, to work, to freedom of expression to family life. Anything. It just is out of control and it won’t stop, it won’t heal: it is a careering runaway train that nothing can be done about. Gwent Police are the St Jude of law enforcement anywhere. Approximately 7 years ago or so, I was being processed by them – rather just locked in the dungeons of Newport Central, naked or in your pants on a little blue mat in a very brightly lit cell staring at orange signs about drug abuse. I had to be transferred up to St Cadoc’s so I could commence my ‘time’. The journey is approximately 5 miles so even though you will be in quite unsavoury conditions for the trip, in a pair of tightly wrenched handcuffs, bouncing around in the back of a farmyard style empty tin crate in the rear end of one of their police vans, it’s not really all that far and unlike some of the other 40 odd mile journeys I’ve experienced, this is but a mere water off a duck’s back. After about 8-10 years of them making any work I did in the music industry or any other sector impossible, I just gave up on trying to get on with society and started just doing a hobby fulltime. I joined a travelling supporters club for Liverpool FC and travelled up to Anfield every week to watch the match live in the stadium and luckily for me 2005 happened to produce a vintage year for the club’s fortunes. Having been to Hillsborough as a young lad about 3 months prior to the actual Hillsborough disaster, this particular football tragedy, where 96 Liverpool Football fans were crushed to death in the stands #jft96, has really had an impact on me, as a lifelong fan of Liverpool Football Club. The Hillsborough Justice Campaign has been fighting for justice for the Hillsborough victims for about 30 years. One of the aims of the justice campaign is to get South Yorkshire, Chief Inspector, David Duckenfield, who ordered the gates at Hillsborough to be shut and thus directly murdered the…

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Review: Altered State – The Story of Ecstasy Culture and Acid House – by Matthew Collin

altered state

I’ve already read a Matthew Collin book – This is Serbia Calling – so I was chuffed when I stumbled upon this work, a history of UK dance music culture. As a DJ and Promoter for 24 years I’m quite aware of a lot of the history of dance music in the UK. This book, however, filled in many of the gaps, and was a thoroughly entertaining and enlightening read. The well known story of how acid house culture came to the UK via Ibiza’s Summer of Love where Nicky Holloway, Danny Rampling, Paul Oakenfold and Trevor Fung experienced the delight’s of Alfredo weaving magic on the White Isle and brought back their ideas to the London clubscene, is a familiar tale, often recited religiously in club culture publications like Mixmag. The author gives a comprehensive account of the beginnings and it was great to hear the true story and what bliss these guys must have experienced. Shoom, Spectrum and the Milk Bar launched successfully and the early adopters were soon welcoming new ‘Acid Teds’ and a hippy revival based on lush house electronica began to hit the mainstream. The book looks at London and Manchester in detail as well as exploring some of the less likelier destinations of UK club culture like Blackburn and later the countryside free party and rave movement. The study of the fracture of dance music into its various sub-genres and the movement of people that followed each branch provides much analysis and we see Warehouse parties, techno anarchists, drum and bass division and later the emergence of new genres like speed garage, grime and dubstep. The book focuses a lot on the role of narcotics in this new ascendant youth culture. The critical importance of ecstasy (MDMA) to the whole movement which eventually led to a massive increase and normalisation of drug culture across the country, with polydrug use becoming popular and clubbers and ravers exploring acid (LSD), cocaine, heroin, ketamine, amphetamines and the various different types of cannabis. It’s amazing how much anti dance music propaganda was spread by the media. Governments were scared and there was a great deal of legislation set up to counter the whole movement. Enlightened masses were a danger to the establishment and the whole culture was seen as an alternative political situation. The long-running battles between promoters, DJs and the UK Police was interesting and it was…

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Review: The Life and Lines of Brandon Block by Matt Trollope

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I was a DJ myself back in the 1990s and although I never played alongside Brandon Block, I had the pleasure of meeting him a couple of times. Once, on his father’s birthday in a London bar/club, I had just got out of one of my early mental health hospital stints and I think Brandon was in recovery…. I asked him for some advice and told him about my experiences and he gave me some real pointers about how to deal with my situation, probably moreso than any other professional who works in this industry has given me. Read this book and you read a tale of horror. People believe that DJing is glamorous and fun, but just get stuck into Brandon’s revealing, heartfelt story, and you will immediately see the pain and suffering that comes your way in the murky world of dance music performance. After all the early breaks, once the scene got into full swing and Brandon Block had established a growing reputation, he was pretty soon stuck into an ounce a day cocaine habit. He’s a personality DJ in house music, meaning not that he chats and laughs while playing – his sets are pure banging party rocking professionally done same as may other at the top of their game. Brandon likes to party too much and his notoriety led him well astray. I loved hearing how he began the whole Space Terrace and his fame in Ibiza alongside Alex P is pretty much unrivalled out Ibiza way. The whole Flying and Charlie Chester story was really interesting even if it broke apart slightly. He seems a down to earth good guy, a victim of his own success. Some of the mental health battles after drug addiction took its toll really hit the nail on the head for me. A lot of the venues and clubs were very familiar as indeed many of the characters. The clubscene fraternity is only but a village, even in its global stretches that it reaches nowadays. The 3 gigs a night blasting around the motorways and hitting lines of coke at every red light when the traffic stopped. All seemed absolutely necessary to continue to deliver the acid house that this Big Name DJ believed in. In latter years Mr Block did his fair share of charity work, feeding back into drug rehabilitation centres as a qualified counsellor. He is…

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Review: Mister Good Times by Norman Jay MBE

mister good times

I was lucky enough to be a warm up DJ for Norman Jay back in the 1990s in The Cross Nightclub, London and I think I was billed on a couple of other events with him. He was a great DJ, I remember him once, in Ministry of Sound, having a full glass of drink topple on the bar decks where he was spinning from the above balcony and Norman, lightning quick just kept the music rolling and not even a skip of the needle. The book is divided up into several unique sections. The first part covers Norman’s Good Times sound system at Notting Hill Carnival which is for what he has been most famous. The whole logistics of such an event is well detailed enough for the professional DJ to thoroughly enjoy and learn from and to any reader the whole politics and excitement and logistics of such a fun event must be enlightening. The book covers Norman’s childhood, whereby he was brought up in Ladbroke Grove, West London to Windrush Caribbean immigrant parents, both of whom seemed very hardworking and supportive and keen to give their family the best start to life. The book discusses a lot about how being a black DJ was defined during the early years of the deck revolution. For me, a highlight was Norman’s journey to New York, where he learnt the best of what would be culturally exported from the USA to British streets. Norman Jay’s love for Tottenham Hotspur football club is covered in detail and during the excitement of terraces and the emergence of the hooligan years it is great reading of times past and the fun and frolics of being a serious football fan. For me, as a Liverpool fan it was truly disturbing to read about racism at Anfield back in the 1970s. Growing up in the John Barnes era of Liverpool, for me I always felt that we were a progressive club when it came to racism which is still a fight in the beautiful game to this very day. I really wanted for the book to keep running once it hit the years of house music. The warehouse parties with Judge Jules thrown across London were particularly interesting, the funniest moment in the tale, when the Met Police tried robbing all the takings from the promoters and Judge Jules and Norman hid under raincoats, pretending…

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Shuffle Show – Xpress Radio – WEEK 1 – 02.11.14

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  The Shuffle Show with Wez G – WEEK 1 – 02.11.14 – XPress Radio The inaugural Shuffle Show on Xpress Radio has some nice cuts of house served up by Wez G plus an interview with Time Flies promoter, Henry Blunt and superstar DJ, Jon Pleased Wimmin. :::TRACKLISTING::: 1. X-Press 2 – Tranz Euro Xpress (The Ride) [Junior Boys Own] 2. Josh One – Contemplation (King Britt Funke Mix) [Hot Tracks] 3. Lexicon Avenue – Psycho Killer [White] 4. Henry Blunt – Xpress Radio Interview 5. Justine – Be Sexy (Sexy Vocal Mix) [UMM] 6. Jon Pleased Wimmin – Passion (A Tin Tin Out Mix) [Perfecto] 7. Jon Pleased Wimmin – Xpress Radio Interview 8. Depeche Mode – Precious (Sasha’s Gargantuan Vocal Mix) [Mute] 9. John Monkman – L.O.V.E.R. (Hallo Halo Remix) [Be Crazy Music] The Shuffle Show is broadcast every Saturday Night / Sunday Morning from Midnight to 1am on Xpress Radio, Cardiff University’s award-winning student radio station http://xpressradio.co.uk MORE: TIME FLIES http://www.timefliesuk.com/ JON PLEASED WIMMIN: https://soundcloud.com/jon-pleased Shuffle Show – Xpress Radio – WEEK 1 – 02.11.14 – Henry Blunt & Jon Pleased Wimmin by Wez G on Mixcloud SHUFFLE SHOW ARCHIVE

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NEW: The Shuffle Show with Wez G – Xpress Radio – Saturdays/Sundays Midnight -1am

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The Shuffle Show is a specialist Dance Music show on Xpress Radio, airing 12am – 1am Sundays (late Saturday night). XPress Radio is the award-winning Cardiff University radio station. I have recently gone back to my studies as a full-time Translation student at Cardiff. I thought that while I was there that I would try to keep the music at a minimum but I couldn’t resist going along to check out a few societies. I went to the Xpress radio meeting and couldn’t believe that there were about 150 people in attendance. I’ve worked in radio for many years, in particular with KryKey (web radio), and I felt that traditional radio was dying or dead, a forgotten medium in the world of podcasts and technology. When I originally went to UCL about twenty years ago, their radio station, Rare FM, was far more rudimentary…. I felt filled with hope about Xpress and, with my new partner-in-crime, Brummie Todd, we decided to put plans into place for a new show. I’ve been dabbling around recently with the Wez G Sessions. This was a ‘traditional style’ radio broadcast, with talking (a broadcast skill I am really no good at!). I aimed, with the Wez G sessions, just to raise my basic skill levels, work with Ableton in a set format, and to provide decent content in bulk for the KryKey network and also for the Caldicot Community Radio station which I was in talks with the council about resurrecting. The Wez G sessions was never a really serious project, though I have enjoyed making it so far, and love listening myself… I haven’t gone hell-for-leather on promoting it (just yet!) and am hoping that people will eventually start tuning in of their own, natural, accord. The Wez G Sessions have been good practice for a potential Xpress show so I thought I would kick on and try and grab a primetime slot, and bring my music to a new, youthful student audience. Todd and I went in for an interview and I rather arrogantly expected us to be given a show as a matter of formality. At the initial session, when they were showing us how to use decks, I was the only person with actual DJ experience. In January 2015 it will be twenty years of my professional DJ career. Surely a show on Xpress would be a breeze? Unfortunately for Todd and…

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