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Working With Languages, MLANG Career Talks, Cardiff University, 08.02.17

  This well attended meeting took place in the Psychology building and welcomed guests from Caerleon Comprehensive – Chloë Samuels and Emma Muggleton, and the European Commission – Paul Kaye, as well as providing information from within MLANG (School of Modern Languages) itself. About 70 students listened and interacted with the presentations over two hours, prior to retiring for Wine and Nibbles. First up was a presentation from the Caerleon Comprehensive School Language department teachers, Chloë Samuels and Emma Muggleton. Chloë is head of the German department there and Emma is overall head of Modern Languages and teaches French. The school is nestled on the outskirts of Newport and is home to over 1600 secondary pupils. Chloë did her degree at Swansea University, spending time abroad in Berlin. Her time abroad inspired her greatly and she decided she would become a teacher of foreign languages. She spoke of the National trend of the decline in foreign languages being bucked by Caerleon Comprehensive, a testament to the success of the languages department there. Chloë and Emma ask the question: Why Teach? Make a difference transferrable skills impact many lives opportunities to advance work anywhere you go Lifelong learning working with teenagers is energising job security holidays are good Everyday is different and you will never be bored Every child is different Autonomy in your classroom give back to the community – watch students grow Express your creativity / personality Humour With respect to why one should specifically teach languages, Chloë suggests: Passions & love of subject ensure students develop a love of language learning inspiring students – making them understand the value of language learning intangible rewards – seeing students achieve, laughing at the funny things they do, supporting, nurturing and helping young people grow Pupil development – from no knowledge to them becoming semi-fluent share cultural knowledge – exploring other cultures Trips abroad – experiencing the student reaction Maintain own language skills They explore the criteria that constitute a good teacher SKILLS Creativity Organisation Dedication Excellent language skills Other subject skills (2 languages often required although not always essential) Sense of humour Able to motivate learners IT Literacy Tenacity They talked about the PGCE teaching certificate and how university courses could be taken to qualify for this. Also mentioning the funding opportunities. More information to be seen here: http://www.getintoteaching.education.gov.uk Both Chloë and Emma were both very inspiring young ladies and…

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Careers in Translation and Interpreting Event, Aston University, 17.12.14

aston university

  On 17th December, with my translation (BA) colleague, Isabelle, from Cardiff University, we headed up the train tracks to the Midlands to the Careers event at Aston University. http://translation.blogs.aston.ac.uk/2014/11/18/careers-in-translation-and-interpreting/ The day’s talks promised to offer multiple perspectives on the different kinds of jobs translators and interpreters can have. The pre-event coffee room was packed and attendance was good, our namebadges reflecting attendance from across the country – many undergraduates and also school students plus a rare few older participants. The event was sponsored by the Routes Into Languages program. Head of Aston’s language department, Christina Schäffner kicked off proceedings with a short welcome and introduction and the event was rapidly underway. We would be looking at different areas of work plus ways of getting started in the profession. The first hour introduced three different professional interpreters who vary in their employment. Rekha Narula gave a great presentation on working in the public service interpreting sector. The attitude of the interpreter and the professional skills they require was very interesting. There are ethical dilemmas and the rather individual, lonely work of the public service interpreter seemed very challenging. The work sounded very rewarding and valuable to society. Cindy Schaller, a French woman interpreter, who spoke almost perfect English with hardly a detectable accent at all, spoke about conference interpreting and also how volunteering could provide valuable experience for newcomers to the industry. Cindy had done a work experience placement at the UN in Vienna and had toured Africa and a variety of other destinations, working in the voluntary sector. Cindy discussed the skills she used as a conference interpreter, from chucotage, to booth work at various levels of comfort and technology. Cindy analysed the business skills that we would require – from accounting to building a client base, to billing and working as an individual. Cindy provided some useful web references for opportunities in the voluntary sector: http://klimaforum.org http://viacampesina.org/en/ http://fsm2011.org/en/ http://www.babels.org Maisy Greenwood was next on the agenda and she had an amazing adventure tale to share with us. At university she had studied arabic in addition to Spanish and French. A job landed at her feet (or rather she had to put herself in the right place at the right time). She was recruited as an interpreter for a Saudi television documentary. For two months Maisy travelled across South America, acting as a Spanish>English>Arabic interpreter. The skills she amassed…

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