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Introduction to Statistical Machine Translation, Post-Editing and AdaptiveMT – Presentation at Cardiff University by Valeria Filippello 08.03.17

Valeria Filippello is a Principal Computational Linguist for SDL, a leading translation technology company. This presentation, an Introduction to Statistical Machine Translation, Post-Editing and AdaptiveMT, was an NSS Careers and Networking Event, organised jointly by the School of Modern languages (MLANG), Cardiff University, and ITI Cymru Wales. Valeria has spent 10 years in her role, her primary task being to test and develop machine translation (MT) and also to train translators in the use of MT. She is a trained translator and interpreter. Why the need for MT? Ability to handle content explosion – for example the launch of a new mobile phone is done very quickly and there needs to be quick translations done for any product release Reduced production costs Faster throughput Greater industry acceptance There is also a greater consumer acceptance of MT. An estimated 75% of web users use free MT tools due to the greater accessibility and integration of MT solutions. 93% of these MT users use it to understand English. Over 90% are non-English speakers. Valeria went on to describe the different types of MT technologies… There is RBMT – Rules-based Machine Translation – the Engine consists of a set of rules, each written by a linguist. RBMT is time-consuming and it’s application is limited. There is SMT – Statistical Machine Translation – on the basis of a large set of examples, the engine learns translation rules for itself. Also, there is Hybrid MT which is any combination of SMT and RBMT Technology. SMT involves a large database where ‘the system “learns” how to translate by analysing statistical relationships between source and target data.’ The Pros and Cons of SMT ADVANTAGES Once the learning system is in place, developing new engines is a quick process Translations are relatively fluent and show some context-sensitivity DISADVANTAGES Needs large databases of good quality to be feasible engine cannot be influenced directly little control on terminology SMT provides solutions for Post-Editing (PE). Post-editing is an ‘en vogue’ category of employment for translators these days. PE is more and more accepted by translators. PE needs to be sustainable in the long term You need the right solution and a good PE process There is a challenge in devising SMT solutions for Post-Editing. Train translators to become efficient post-editors Retrain MT engines taking into account post-editors’ feedback Here are some types of SMT solutions BASELINES eg. Google Translate VERTICALS –…

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ITI Cymru Wales Event Cardiff University 08.11.14

iti cymru wales

  I received an invite on my university email address to a free event at Cardiff University, arranged by ITI Cymru Wales ( @ITICymruWales ). The Saturday workshop was to be focussed on technology in translation and I felt it would be an ideal opportunity to get to meet some actual working translators in Wales plus to learn about a specific subject area within translation that I find appealing. If I complete my degree successfully and actually become a professional translator, the chances are that I will be building on existing tech skills and working in some way in the tech side of translation. The workshop was to focus on developing your skills as a translator in the digital environment – we would learn how to use some useful translation tools and think about working with the web as a tool. I packed my lunchbox and headed out on the train to Cardiff on a wet Autumn International rugby day. There was a good crowd of about 40 people, filling up the lecture theatre at Cardiff University’s Centre For Lifelong Learning. It was to be the ITI Cymru Wales’ biggest event to date. The costs to attend the convention were free which was an added bonus. I was quite nervous, not knowing anybody there as it was my first foray into the world of professional translators. I felt, as a first year student, that I was a bit out of place and had general newbie nerves. The first talk was by Elvana Moore ( @MoreAlbanian ) on the use of the ProZ.com website / forum for translators and interpreters.   I’d set up a profile on ProZ.com already but haven’t used the site as yet. Elvana gave us a good hour and a half’s worth of instruction on how to best use this vast translation-specific website. It could be the biggest source of our work as translators and was an invaluable resource. She explored the intricacies on how to best set up your profile and demonstrated the key features of the site. I hadn’t previously understood the Kudoz system on ProZ and can see what a great way it is of exchanging ideas on translation and a great way of building your profile and becoming a real part of the international translator community. Elvana stressed that she was in no way a salesperson for ProZ but equally I think she was able…

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