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Le Filtre Français

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« Le succès du filtre Facebook rappelle que l’indignation est parfois sélective. » Selon vous : «  Est-ce une raison pour brocarder ceux qui l’adoptent pour exprimer publiquement leur solidarité ? » Après les attaques terroristes à Paris en novembre 2015, un filtre qui vous permet de changer votre photo de profil à celle du tricolore français est apparu sur Facebook. Ce filtre vous permet supposément de montrer votre solidarité avec les victimes des attaques. Le filtre s’est révélé très populaire et s’est répandu de manière virale à travers le monde occidental. Cependant, le filtre a également suscité des critiques de certains milieux et dans cet essai, nous visons à discuter une partie de la controverse entourant le filtre. Est-ce que l’indignation est parfois sélective ? Est-ce qu’il faut brocarder ceux qui adoptent le filtre ? D’une part, la popularité du filtre est un excellent moyen de montrer la solidarité contre les terroristes horribles. Que le filtre s’est répandu jusqu’ici et large montre comment offensé le monde occidental a été par l’outrage terroriste. D’autre part, l’utilisation du filtre peut être critiquée. Pourquoi un filtre pour les victimes de l’attaque au Liban la veille des attaques de Paris n’a-t-il pas été utilisé? L’utilisation du filtre démontre l’eurocentrisme et montre peut-être la limite de notre empathie. Non seulement il y a des attaques terroristes à Paris, mais aussi à Bagdad, en Syrie, au Pakistan, mais pourquoi ne changeons-nous pas nos drapeaux pour ceux de ces pays? On peut dire que peut-être nous valorisons les victimes occidentales, les femmes dans leurs chapeaux de magasins laineux, plus que ces femmes voilées du Moyen-Orient. Est-ce un signe de la suprématie blanche que nous choisissons de draper nos photos de profil avec le tricolore? C’est un signe d’indignation sélective. Mais on peut nous pardonner de faire preuve de solidarité avec nos voisins? Les attaques terroristes sont pratiquement sur notre porte. Paris est une ville où nous passons des escapades romantiques de week-end, que nous étudions en détail dans nos cours de français GCSE, la capitale de notre voisin le plus proche. Une attaque contre Paris est sûrement une attaque contre nous? Je pense qu’il est naturel que nous devions faire preuve d’empathie pour les victimes des attaques de Paris. Cependant, y aurait-il une meilleure façon de manifester de l’indignation contre les terroristes? D’autres groupes ont essayé d’imiter le succès du filtre français. Par exemple, les militants du mariage homosexuel aux États-Unis ont introduit un…

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Review: Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises – by Ernest Hemingway

Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway My rating: 4 of 5 stars My love affair with Hemingway continues and Fiesta is the latest work of his that I have thrown myself into and conveniently it is all about a love affair. The tension of the love between Jake and the wild aristocratic Brett builds up in the city of Paris. We see a high life throughout this book. The chief protagonists certainly understand how best to enjoy their time. Washing machines and home cooked dinners are not on the agenda. We flit from bar to bar, restaurant to restaurant and the mouthwatering selection of food and drink is so succulently described that by the time Jake hit San Sebastian towards the end of the book I could actually savor the taste of his drinks. Hemingway is rich on description and all of his writing very cleverly conjures up mental images describing in detail the environment his characters inhabit. Fiesta is no different and if anything the landscape described in this book is perhaps richer. We can see that the author knows his terrain well. He is passionate about France and Spain and nowhere does this passion manifest itself more than at the Festival of San Fermin at Pamplona. From ‘Death In The Afternoon’ I know that Hemingway deeply admires bullfighting. The sejour at San Fermin allows this knowledge and love of La Corrida to manifest itself in fiction. Jake, an American, is rare as a foreigner, in that he is an initiate of this cultural sport. The relationship with Montoya, in whose hotel they reside, is poignant in the way Jake and Montoya interact as they discuss the intricacies of the weeks long activities centered upon the bulls. The wild partying of the week long fiesta culminates in an anarchic breakup of the group of friends. the boxer loses his temper, there is an excess of alcohol and Brett, who is the center of attention for all the men, decides to run off with the festival’s leading young bullfighter. They split away and head off in their own directions and it is Jake who comes to the rescue of Brett as she winds up in Madrid. It is obvious throughout that they deeply care for each other but their very lifestyle doesn’t allow them to be together. As the book ends with them travelling down a Madrid street…

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Review: Sixty Million Frenchmen Can’t Be Wrong

Sixty Million Frenchmen Can’t Be Wrong by Jean-Benoît Nadeau My rating: 4 of 5 stars Although this book was written over a decade ago, it is a great study of the French people that is still relevant today. It is an anthropological assessment and takes a broad stance in how it assesses France. The authors are a Canadian couple so many of the ideas and comparisons are taken from a North American standpoint. A two year study of the French yields many quaint anecdotes as to how and why the French are as they are. In my own experience of France, the French, French language, culture and cuisine, I felt that I was already a true Francophile and knowledgeable about this great country. This book takes my understanding to a deeper level. It points out the reason for many intricacies of French behaviour that I had previously not properly understood. The tendency of French people to be over-correcting about language use is something I have noticed and although, I personally enjoy my linguistic skills being polished, I appreciate that the French do this in a seemingly pedantic way which some foreigners may find offensive. When you get to see the importance of l’Académie française and how it has affected the French language you can understand the pride the French take in their use of words and it is no surprise to learn that literary standards are on average a great deal higher in France than in other developed nations. The book does focus very heavily on the nature of French government. I now understand exactly what Jacobin is: the centralist tendency of French government, with power totally focused on Paris. It is interesting to see how the whole political system has developed, from early autocracy with supreme leaders to a well-balanced modern democracy. There were good explanations and descriptions of the French passion for food and their natural links to the peasants who work the land. I hadn’t realised about the French education system and the way they foster elites, in particular to train to work for their huge civil service. I had thought it was a university system similar to that of Britain or the USA but it quite apparently isn’t. I felt that the book overall gave me a great deal of insight into different aspects of France and opened the door for future study. The book was…

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Review: On Paris

On Paris by Ernest Hemingway My rating: 4 of 5 stars This very brief work is a collection of Hemingway’s writings as a foreign correspondent for the Toronto Star. The author’s bright prose lights up what I believe to be the most fantastic city on earth, during the turbulent times of the 1920s. Paris was in a post-Versailles dilemma, the politicians fighting for German reparations and dangerously questing into the Ruhr valley. Hemingway vibrantly details the glamorous life in the French capital. The post-absinthe hedonism, the cafe culture, the nightlife of the Moulin Rouge. He contrasts the French joie de vivre with that of other European capitals and with a flamboyant passion for Paris, he brings to life this exotic city for all his readers. View all my reviews

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