DJ Wez G - the finest House Music, Chillout and Drum & Bass close ×
+

Introduction to Statistical Machine Translation, Post-Editing and AdaptiveMT – Presentation at Cardiff University by Valeria Filippello 08.03.17

Valeria Filippello is a Principal Computational Linguist for SDL, a leading translation technology company. This presentation, an Introduction to Statistical Machine Translation, Post-Editing and AdaptiveMT, was an NSS Careers and Networking Event, organised jointly by the School of Modern languages (MLANG), Cardiff University, and ITI Cymru Wales. Valeria has spent 10 years in her role, her primary task being to test and develop machine translation (MT) and also to train translators in the use of MT. She is a trained translator and interpreter. Why the need for MT? Ability to handle content explosion – for example the launch of a new mobile phone is done very quickly and there needs to be quick translations done for any product release Reduced production costs Faster throughput Greater industry acceptance There is also a greater consumer acceptance of MT. An estimated 75% of web users use free MT tools due to the greater accessibility and integration of MT solutions. 93% of these MT users use it to understand English. Over 90% are non-English speakers. Valeria went on to describe the different types of MT technologies… There is RBMT – Rules-based Machine Translation – the Engine consists of a set of rules, each written by a linguist. RBMT is time-consuming and it’s application is limited. There is SMT – Statistical Machine Translation – on the basis of a large set of examples, the engine learns translation rules for itself. Also, there is Hybrid MT which is any combination of SMT and RBMT Technology. SMT involves a large database where ‘the system “learns” how to translate by analysing statistical relationships between source and target data.’ The Pros and Cons of SMT ADVANTAGES Once the learning system is in place, developing new engines is a quick process Translations are relatively fluent and show some context-sensitivity DISADVANTAGES Needs large databases of good quality to be feasible engine cannot be influenced directly little control on terminology SMT provides solutions for Post-Editing (PE). Post-editing is an ‘en vogue’ category of employment for translators these days. PE is more and more accepted by translators. PE needs to be sustainable in the long term You need the right solution and a good PE process There is a challenge in devising SMT solutions for Post-Editing. Train translators to become efficient post-editors Retrain MT engines taking into account post-editors’ feedback Here are some types of SMT solutions BASELINES eg. Google Translate VERTICALS –…

Read more

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest


Review: Translation and Globalization – by Michael Cronin

Translation and Globalization by Michael Cronin My rating: 4 of 5 stars This book, by Irish author Michael Cronin, explores translation studies from a globalization perspective with specific attention paid to the situation in Ireland. Globalization is a trend which is ever-increasing in our world and it is an undeniable fact. How do translators fit into this movement of culture? They are involved whether they support globalization or not and very often they must remain unbiased in their views. As contact increases between different cultures and language groups across the planet the translator is finding himself ever more involved. Technology issues and localisation are covered and this is particularly relevant to Ireland which has set itself up as a hub for the international technological revolution. The book analyses the different cultural conflicts which arise in translation as a result of globalization. What are the relationships between powerful global languages and more minor ones? I found the final chapter on minor languages, looking in detail at Irish Gaelic, most interesting. When one is a native speaker of English it is difficult to overlook the factors affecting translators of minor languages whose working lives and structure and thinking are markedly different to the bulk of translators. The book is very well written and gives a comprehensive outlook on Translation Studies, never veering too far from the underlying topic of globalization. I found it easy to follow and rich in its definitions and examples. I will be using the specific content on Translation History for my next essay. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Translation-mediated Communication in a Digital World

Translation-mediated Communication in a Digital World by Minako O’Hagan My rating: 3 of 5 stars This book was published in 2002 and obviously a lot has changed in twelve years in the filed of technology. Bearing in mind that it is outdated, there are, however, some very good valid points which are raised about translation-mediated communication in the computer age. Translators need a new set of skills in order to function in the modern age. There is a movement towards machine translation and the way in which it integrates into traditional styles of translation is a new subject for translation studies. The whole internet and the increasing need for webpage translation means that translators need to be aware of web languages and also about the varied nature of websites. The whole language of websites is different. People do not read websites like they do books or traditional forms of media and this the language to be translated is different. I found the whole approach of the book to the translator’s role in globalisation to bring some good far-reaching ideas into my mind about the future of translation. I left this book wondering more about the subject and the possibilities of technology. To be critical of the book, there was an overuse of acronyms. TMC was easy enough to adapt to but I found that the steady introduction of new acronyms in the text just became overbearing and confusing so that I couldn’t remember what was being referred to. There was a fair bit of repetition of ideas and sometimes the language became too over-technical and unnecessarily complicated and was very difficult to follow. I think the authors are obviously talented people in this field and have critical knowledge. I would like to see the book brought up to date for today’s situation. The ideas identified in this work were very prophetic and this indicates the high level of competence in the study. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Mouse or Rat?: Translation as Negotiation

Mouse or Rat?

Mouse or Rat?: Translation as Negotiation by Umberto Eco My rating: 4 of 5 stars This book is a collection of essays on the topic of translation. It is constantly exploring the role of the translator as a negotiator is the way he interprets texts for his target audience. Eco points towards an underlying perfect language that writer uses which transcends the individual tongues a work may be written in. What duty does the translator have in presenting an author’s true thoughts? The examples are plentiful and obviously abound from a man with a great deal of real-life experience as a translator. I found the in depth discussion of poetry translation a little over my head and very complicated but it gives you something to aim at as you learn the art and process of becoming a translator. The essays build on the work of other translation scholars and argues for and against their ideas and methods. I found that the text reads very well and is an ideal compliment to the more formal study one gets from course texts. I am sure that after a few rereads Umberto Eco’s message will reveal itself more fully to me. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

Review: Mouse or Rat?: Translation as Negotiation

Mouse or Rat?: Translation as Negotiation by Umberto Eco My rating: 4 of 5 stars This book is a collection of essays on the topic of translation. It is constantly exploring the role of the translator as a negotiator is the way he interprets texts for his target audience. Eco points towards an underlying perfect language that writer uses which transcends the individual tongues a work may be written in. What duty does the translator have in presenting an author’s true thoughts? The examples are plentiful and obviously abound from a man with a great deal of real-life experience as a translator. I found the in depth discussion of poetry translation a little over my head and very complicated but it gives you something to aim at as you learn the art and process of becoming a translator. The essays build on the work of other translation scholars and argues for and against their ideas and methods. I found that the text reads very well and is an ideal compliment to the more formal study one gets from course texts. I am sure that after a few rereads Umberto Eco’s message will reveal itself more fully to me. View all my reviews

Share : facebooktwittergoogle plus
pinterest

1 2